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I am attempting to run the following LINQ query using Entity Framework 5:

int taskId = 2;

query = from a in Table_A
        where a.StatusCode != "DONE"
           && a.Inbound
        join b in Table_B
            on a.Id equals b.Id_Table_A
        join c in Table_C
            on a.State equals (c.State ?? a.State)
        where 2 == c.Id_Task
           && b.DataType == c.DataType
        select a.Id;

The line that is causing me problems is:

on a.State equals (c.State ?? a.State)

The "State" field in Table_C is nullable... and when it is null, it is used to imply "all states". As such, when "c.State" is null I want the record to be matched. If I were to write this in SQL, I would use the following:

JOIN Table_C ON Table_A.State = ISNULL(Table_C.State, Table_A.State)

Unfortunately, I am being given the following error:

The name 'a' is not in scope on the right side of 'equals'. Consider swapping the expressions on either side of 'equals'.

I will be grateful to anybody who can let me in on the secret to getting this working.

Thanks.

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Instead of on a.State equals (c.State ?? a.State) try this: on (c.State == null || a.State equals c.State) –  Anchit Jan 16 '13 at 10:53
    
Thanks Anchit... but unfortunately that does not work. I am getting the following error: <b>The name 'c' is not in scope on the left side of 'equals'. Consider swapping the expressions on either side of 'equals'.</b> –  Rob G Jan 16 '13 at 10:57
    
check my answer, it should work. Let me know if it doesn't. –  Anchit Jan 16 '13 at 11:39
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2 Answers 2

You can modify your code like:

int taskId = 2;

query = from a in Table_A
        where a.StatusCode != "DONE"
           && a.Inbound
        join b in Table_B
            on a.Id equals b.Id_Table_A
        from c in Table_C
        where 2 == c.Id_Task
           && b.DataType == c.DataType
           && (c.State == null || a.State.Equals(c.State))
        select a.Id;

A join is essentially a where clause, so here we can use the where clause due to the restrictions with join.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again Anchit. That does not work either in my case due to the fact that there is no relationship between "Table_C" and "Table_A" in the model. Running the query caused a NotSupportedException to be thrown, with the description "Unable to create a constant value of type '[type used for Table_C]'. Only primitive types or enumeration types are supported in this context.". –  Rob G Jan 16 '13 at 11:39
    
For this code to work, there doesn't need to be any relationship between Table_C and Table_A. I made an edit to my initial post, so maybe you missed something there. Can you post what code you actually used? The problem I think is that in the where condition you might've put c == null instead of c.State == null. –  Anchit Jan 16 '13 at 11:44
    
I double-checked that I was using ==, and not =... and I was doing it exactly as stated. It still throws that exception. I think I may have found a solution to it; by finding something to JOIN on and using the "State" filter in the WHERE clause; similar to what you have done. Once I have finished testing it, I will post it. :) –  Rob G Jan 16 '13 at 11:59
    
Yes, you can do that also, do a left outer join and then filter using the where clause –  Anchit Jan 16 '13 at 12:14
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I managed to get this to work by moving the "DataType" check from the WHERE to the JOIN, and moving the "State" check from the JOIN to the WHERE. The resulting code that worked as I expected is as follows:

query = from a in Table_A
        where a.StatusCode != "DONE"
           && a.Inbound
        join b in Table_B
            on a.Id equals b.Id_Table_A
        join c in Table_C
            on b.DataType equals c.DataType
        where 2 == c.Id_Task
            && (c.State ?? a.State) == a.State
        select a.Id;

Many thanks to everybody who has taken a look at this for me. :)

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