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I'm a fresh learner of OOP approach in java and I have some problems with my system. I'm currently doing a simple GUI system. In a jForm, supposedly I have to write all my codes there as a procedural approach. But I want to try it to code in a separate class (OOP). And all I have to do in the main form is to invoke the methods I created on the other class. But my main problem is how am I going to call or invoke an object from a form to another class.

Here's an example...

public void checkUser(){
    try {
        sql = "SELECT accessLevel FROM user_accounts WHERE userName = 'admin'";
        stmt = conn.createStatement();
        rs = stmt.executeQuery(sql);
        rs.first();
        int accessLvl = rs.getInt(1);
        if (accessLvl != 1){
            btnAddUser.setEnabled(false);
            jPanel3.setEnabled(false);
        }
    }
    catch(Exception e){
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Exception on Verifying User");
    }
}

I want this method (checkUser()) to be written in another class instead of putting it inside the main form. But my problem is I cannot access the object btnAddUser (button name) and JPanel13 (panel name) which were initiated in the main form. And if I will directly use How can I possibly access those objects so that I access them to other classes.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can write this method as a static into the another class, like below which accepts two parameters one if JButton and other is JPanel

 public static void checkUser(JButton btnAddUser,JPanel jPanel3){
   try {
      sql = "SELECT accessLevel FROM user_accounts WHERE userName = 'admin'";
      stmt = conn.createStatement();
      rs = stmt.executeQuery(sql);
      rs.first();
      int accessLvl = rs.getInt(1);
      if (accessLvl != 1){
          btnAddUser.setEnabled(false);
          jPanel3.setEnabled(false);
      }
  }
  catch(Exception e){
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Exception on Verifying User");
  }

}

and you can call this method from where you written the code before like

 NewClass.checkUser(btnAddUser,jPanel3);

NewClass is the class in which you have written this checkUser() method.

you also need to pass parameters to method like sql string, Statement and ResultSet objects, or declare them as static so you can easily access them anywhere using class name.

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thanks for this answer... I included the arguments for the method checkUser(Connection conn, String user){...} I have done a code like this to call the object... myMainClass.btnAddUser.setEnabled(false) –  Jay Marz Jan 17 '13 at 11:40
    
and then instantiating those objects as public and static on the main class... –  Jay Marz Jan 17 '13 at 11:49
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But my problem is I cannot access the object btnAddUser (button name) and JPanel13 (panel name) which were initiated in the main form.

You need to declare this as class variables in a class, assign proper getter and setter methods, then instantiate this class to retrieve the values.

Further as Nick said, you need to separate the code logically which will make the complete design modular. Here, you can move the database code into a separate DataAccess class and expose the methods for quering. The connection object can be created in the constructor.

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Your checkUser method should:

  • accept a parameter that is the username to check (replace the java.sql.Statement with a java.sql.PreparedStatement when you do this).
  • return a boolean that the calling code (your form) uses to enable or disable the components as need be.
  • throw the exception that the calling code (your form) can catch and display the message dialog.

Among other things OOP is about seperation of concerns - your form deals with the UI, the class with the checkUser method deals with user authentication.

As an aside, functions like checkUser would normally throw an exception is authentication fails. This is because it's all too easy for somebody using the method to fail to check the return value and allow an unauthenticated user into the system.

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This tutorial might offer some insights and put you on the right path. There are plenty more different solutions and tutorials out there.

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