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I have a requirement in my testing as when I am calling a function I am initializing the structure with 0. But, the moment function ex() gets called, ab the object of struct abc caontains garbage. But I need to the structure abc should get initialized with 0.

Because I don't have access to function ex(). So, whatever things I need to set, I need to set from main().

struct abc{
    int a[4];
};
void ex()
{
abc ab;
    printf("%d\n", ab.a);//Garbage value
}
int main()
{
    abc ab;
    memset(&ab, 0, sizeof(abc));
    printf("%d\n", ab.a);
return 0;
}

Please help.

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3  
Add a constructor that does whatever initialization you need. –  Pete Becker Jan 16 '13 at 11:56
1  
abc ab = {{0}}; does it. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '13 at 11:56
    
You tagged C and C++, the answers are different for each, which one did you want? –  Mike Jan 16 '13 at 12:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can give abc a default constructor that initializes the elements of the array to 0. This gets rid of the garbage values:

struct abc {
    int a[4];
    abc() : a() {}
};

Next, if you want myex to print the data of the abc created in main, you should give it an abc reference parameter. This is a C++11 version of myex:

#include <iostream>

void myex(const abc& item)
{
  for (const auto& n : item.a)
  {
    std::cout << n << " ";
  }
  std::cout << "\n";
}

int main()
{
  abc myabc;
  myex(myabc);
}
share|improve this answer

ab in ex is a different object from ab in main; initializing one doesn't affect the other.

If you intend for ab to refer to the same object in both main and ex, then you need to do one of the following:

  • pass ab as an argument to ex from main;
  • declare ab at file scope (outside of either ex or main);
share|improve this answer

change the structure definition to following. That will take care

struct abc{
  int a[4];

  abc()
  { memset(a, 0, 4*sizeof(int)); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
No need for memset. Better to use an idiom that would work for user defined types too. –  juanchopanza Jan 16 '13 at 12:15
    
@paper.plane: I can not touch the code of struct abc. So, I can not change it's definition –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jan 16 '13 at 12:19

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