Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am not able to find a good summary to describe my problem (suggestions welcome)

I have following two classes:

Test1

import java.lang.reflect.Method;

abstract class Test1 {

    boolean condition = true;

    public void f() {
        System.out.println("Test1 : f");
    }

    public void g() {
        System.out.println("Test1 : g");
        f();
        if (condition) {
            f(); // call Test1.f() here. HOW?

            // Following didn't work
            try {
                Method m = Test1.class.getDeclaredMethod("f");
                m.invoke(this);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.err.println(e);
            }
        }
    }
}

Test2

class Test2 extends Test1 {

    public void f() {
        System.out.println("Test2 : f ");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test2 t2 = new Test2();
        t2.g();
    }

}

The output is:

Test1 : g
Test2 : f
Test2 : f
Test2 : f

The problem is that due to some special condition given by condition field in Test1 I want to call Test1's f() in g() even though I am calling using an object of Test2.

I tried reflection but it doesn't work either. Any suggestions?

EDIT 1: I didn't mention it specifically, but if you see carefully Test1 is abstract. So I cannot create its object.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

You should seriously consider the logic you are trying to build. The reason you tried to override the method f in child class has sure a reason behind it.

Alternatively, you can have boolean value as return from method f and in child method use boolean r = super.f(); if(r){//execute child logic.} This should solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
The logic is complex, that's true. But I don't see your point, super.f() returns void, that's not assignable to boolean. –  GaborSch Jan 16 '13 at 12:12
    
I was recommending to change void to boolean. This will help take the decision on execution of child method logic. –  CuriousMind Jan 16 '13 at 12:18
    
The logic, whether to call the parent or not, comes from the internal logic of g(). It may not be implemented for all calls to f() (e.g from a call of h()). –  GaborSch Jan 16 '13 at 12:57

what I understood.

Your Question:
If g() is calling method f() in Test1 class Then why its runing f() of child (Test2) class.

Answer: From JLS-8.4.8.1

The subclass Test2 declares a single method f(), which overrides the method f() of Test1. It inherits the methods g() from class Test1.

The critical point about overriding in this example is that the method g(), which is declared in class Test1, invokes the f() method defined by the current object this, which is not necessarily the f() method declared in class Test1.

Thus, when g() is invoked in main using the Test2 object t2, the invocation of f() in the body of the g() method is an invocation of the f() of the object t2. This allows a subclass of Test1to change the behavior of the f() method without redefining it.

Concussion:

So if some class is overriding some method of its parent then contract says, Test1 which is designed to be extended, should clearly indicate what is the contract between the class and its subclasses, and should clearly indicate that subclasses may override the f() method in this way.

share|improve this answer

Add a method f2 in Test1:

private void f2() {
    System.out.println("Test1 : f");
}
public void f() {
    this.f2()
}

This way you can call f2() when the condition is true.

share|improve this answer

if the method name is same you can't do that.
Other way is possible calling the super class methods directly in the sub class by using super.f().

share|improve this answer

UPD: specially for that person, who is not quite attentive, I'm giving the explanation.

In my code below I'm creating new anonymous class using brackets { }. This allows me to make new instance of subclassed Test1.


Instead of using reflection you could do just such funny thing:

public void g() {
    System.out.println("Test1 : g");
    f();
    if (condition) {
         new Test1(){}.f();
    }
}

The only one disadvantage is that f() method called such way is invocation of method of absolutely another object.

share|improve this answer
    
Test1 is abstract, so I cannot create its object. –  Xolve Jan 16 '13 at 12:30
2  
@Xolve, new Test1(){} it is an object created using anonymous class. So, I can. –  Andremoniy Jan 16 '13 at 12:30
    
@Xolve, may be you didn't noticed, but after new Test1() there are {} brackets. –  Andremoniy Jan 16 '13 at 12:31
    
@Andremoniy We don't know the reason why Test1 is made abstract, there may be other methods that you have to implement. –  GaborSch Jan 16 '13 at 12:47
    
@GaborSch we are talking about this particular case. BTW I +1 your answer, in common case your solution, of course, is better. My answer is just alternative to using reflection. –  Andremoniy Jan 16 '13 at 12:48

Inheritance only allows you to inherit the behavior super.f(), override it @Overrideor both

@Override
public void f(){
    super.f(); 
    //do something  
}

You cant override a method and then try calling the parents method state before it was overridden. Inheritance doesn't work like that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.