Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a pandas.DataFrame with measurements taken at consecutive points in time. Along with each measurement the system under observation had a distinct state at each point in time. Hence, the DataFrame also contains a column with the state of the system at each measurement. State changes are much slower than the measurement interval. As a result, the column indicating the states might look like this (index: state):

1:  3
2:  3
3:  3
4:  3
5:  4
6:  4
7:  4
8:  4
9:  1
10: 1
11: 1
12: 1
13: 1

Is there an easy way to retrieve the indices of each segment of consecutively equal states. That means I would like to get something like this:

[[1,2,3,4], [5,6,7,8], [9,10,11,12,13]]

The result might also be in something different than plain lists.

The only solution I could think of so far is manually iterating over the rows, finding segment change points and reconstructing the indices from these change points, but I have the hope that there is an easier solution.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One-liner:

df.reset_index().groupby('A')['index'].apply(lambda x: np.array(x))

Code for example:

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: from pandas import *

In [3]: df = DataFrame([3]*4+[4]*4+[1]*4, columns=['A'])
In [4]: df
Out[4]:
    A
0   3
1   3
2   3
3   3
4   4
5   4
6   4
7   4
8   1
9   1
10  1
11  1

In [5]: df.reset_index().groupby('A')['index'].apply(lambda x: np.array(x))
Out[5]:
A
1    [8, 9, 10, 11]
3      [0, 1, 2, 3]
4      [4, 5, 6, 7]

You can also directly access the information from the groupby object:

In [1]: grp = df.groupby('A')

In [2]: grp.indices
Out[2]:
{1L: array([ 8,  9, 10, 11], dtype=int64),
 3L: array([0, 1, 2, 3], dtype=int64),
 4L: array([4, 5, 6, 7], dtype=int64)}

In [3]: grp.indices[3]
Out[3]: array([0, 1, 2, 3], dtype=int64)

To address the situation that DSM mentioned you could do something like:

In [1]: df['block'] = (df.A.shift(1) != df.A).astype(int).cumsum()

In [2]: df
Out[2]:
    A  block
0   3      1
1   3      1
2   3      1
3   3      1
4   4      2
5   4      2
6   4      2
7   4      2
8   1      3
9   1      3
10  1      3
11  1      3
12  3      4
13  3      4
14  3      4
15  3      4

Now groupby both columns and apply the lambda function:

In [77]: df.reset_index().groupby(['A','block'])['index'].apply(lambda x: np.array(x))
Out[77]:
A  block
1  3          [8, 9, 10, 11]
3  1            [0, 1, 2, 3]
   4        [12, 13, 14, 15]
4  2            [4, 5, 6, 7]
share|improve this answer
2  
This assumes that the values don't repeat in discontiguous segments -- for example, DataFrame([3]*4+[4]*4+[1]*4 + [3]*4, columns=['A']) will put the two groups of 3 into the same group. You could scan those for breaks, but that's just another version of the original problem. Maybe there's a way to get the pandas groupby to behave more like itertools.groupby here, though. –  DSM Jan 16 '13 at 14:27
    
Thanks, your second solution works well. I actually have the situation described by DSM. –  languitar Jan 17 '13 at 17:29
    
How might this be done if your were to want to group by some deviation (e.g. groups contain values where all values are within +-1 of adjacent values in the original set) –  shootingstars May 20 at 9:22

You could use np.diff() to test where a segment starts/ends and iterate over those results. Its a very simple solution, so probably not the most performent one.

a = np.array([3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,4,1,1,1,1,4,4,12,12,12])

prev = 0
splits = np.append(np.where(np.diff(a) != 0)[0],len(a)+1)+1

for split in splits:
    print np.arange(1,a.size+1,1)[prev:split]
    prev = split

Results in:

[1 2 3 4 5]
[ 6  7  8  9 10]
[11 12 13 14]
[15 16]
[17 18 19]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, actually the solution by Zelazny7 is more convenient for because I like to store the segments in the DataFrame and it automatically achieves this. –  languitar Jan 17 '13 at 17:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.