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I'm fairly new to python and I'm stuck on how to structure my simple script when using command line arguments.

The purpose of the script is to automate some daily tasks in my job relating to sorting and manipulating images.

I can specify the arguments and get them to call the relevant functions, but i also want to set a default action when no arguments are supplied.

Here's my current structure.

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("-l", "--list", help="Create CSV of images", action="store_true")
parser.add_argument("-d", "--dimensions", help="Copy images with incorrect dimensions to new directory", action="store_true")
parser.add_argument("-i", "--interactive", help="Run script in interactive mode", action="store_true")
args = parser.parse_args()

if args.list:
    func1()
if args.interactive:
    func2()
if args.dimensions:
    func3()

But when I supply no arguments nothing will be called.

Namespace(dimensions=False, interactive=False, list=False)

What i want is some default behaviour if no arguements are supplied

if args.list:
        func1()
    if args.interactive:
        func2()
    if args.dimensions:
        func3()
    if no args supplied:
        func1()
        func2()
        func3()

This seems like it should be fairly easy to achieve but I'm lost on the logic of how to detect all arguments are false without looping through the arguments and testing if all are false.

Update

Multiple arguments are valid together, that is why I didn't go down the elif route.

Update 2

Here is my updated code taking into account the answer from @unutbu

it doesn't seem ideal as everything is wrapped in an if statement but in the short term i couldn't find a better solution. I'm happy to accept the answer from @unutbu, any other improvements offered would be appreciated.

lists = analyseImages()
    if lists:
        statusTable(lists)

        createCsvPartial = partial(createCsv, lists['file_list'])
        controlInputParital = partial(controlInput, lists)
        resizeImagePartial = partial(resizeImage, lists['resized'])
        optimiseImagePartial = partial(optimiseImage, lists['size_issues'])
        dimensionIssuesPartial = partial(dimensionIssues, lists['dim_issues'])

        parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
        parser.add_argument(
        "-l", "--list", 
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=createCsvPartial,
        help="Create CSV of images",)
        parser.add_argument(
        "-c", "--convert", 
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=resizeImagePartial,
        help="Convert images from 1500 x 2000px to 900 x 1200px ",)
        parser.add_argument(
        "-o", "--optimise", 
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=optimiseImagePartial,    
        help="Optimise filesize for 900 x 1200px images",)
        parser.add_argument(
        "-d", "--dimensions", 
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=dimensionIssuesPartial,
        help="Copy images with incorrect dimensions to new directory",)
        parser.add_argument(
        "-i", "--interactive", 
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=controlInputParital,
        help="Run script in interactive mode",)
        args = parser.parse_args()

        if not args.funcs:
            args.funcs = [createCsvPartial, resizeImagePartial, optimiseImagePartial, dimensionIssuesPartial]

        for func in args.funcs:
            func()

    else:
        print 'No jpegs found'
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could append_const the funcs to an attribute, args.funcs, and then use one if-statement to supply the default behavior if no options are set:

if not args.funcs:
    args.funcs = [func1, func2, func3]

import argparse

def func1(): pass
def func2(): pass
def func3(): pass

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument(
    "-l", "--list",
    dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=func1,
    help="Create CSV of images", )
parser.add_argument(
    "-i", "--interactive",
    dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=func2,
    help="Run script in interactive mode",)
parser.add_argument(
    "-d", "--dimensions",
    dest='funcs', action='append_const', const=func3,
    help="Copy images with incorrect dimensions to new directory")
args = parser.parse_args()
if not args.funcs:
    args.funcs = [func1, func2, func3]

for func in args.funcs:
    print(func.func_name)
    func()

% test.py
func1
func2
func3

% test.py -d
func3

% test.py -d -i
func3
func2

Note that, unlike your original code, this allows the user to control the order the functions are called:

% test.py -i -d
func2
func3

That may or may not be desireable.


In response to Update 2:

Your code will work just fine. However, here is another way you could organize it:

  • Instead of nesting the main program inside an if clause, you could use

    if not lists:
        sys.exit('No jpegs found')
    # put main program here, unnested
    

    sys.exit will print No jpegs found to stderr and terminate with exit code 1.

  • Although I originally suggested using functools.partial, another -- perhaps simpler -- way now comes to mind: Instead of

    for func in args.funcs:
        func()
    

    we could say

    for func, args in args.funcs:
        func(args)
    

    All we need to do is store a tuple (func, args) in args.func instead of the function alone.

For example:

import argparse
import sys

def parse_args(lists):
    funcs = {
        'createCsv': (createCsv, lists['file_list']),
        'resizeImage': (resizeImage, lists['resized']),
        'optimiseImage': (optimiseImage, lists['size_issues']),
        'dimensionIssues': (dimensionIssues, lists['dim_issues']),
        'controlInput': (controlInput, lists)
    }
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument(
        "-l", "--list",
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=funcs['createCsv'],
        help="Create CSV of images",)
    parser.add_argument(
        "-c", "--convert",
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=funcs['resizeImage'],
        help="Convert images from 1500 x 2000px to 900 x 1200px ",)
    parser.add_argument(
        "-o", "--optimise",
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=funcs['optimiseImage'],
        help="Optimise filesize for 900 x 1200px images",)
    parser.add_argument(
        "-d", "--dimensions",
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=funcs['dimensionIssues'],
        help="Copy images with incorrect dimensions to new directory",)
    parser.add_argument(
        "-i", "--interactive",
        dest='funcs', action="append_const", const=funcs['controlInput'],
        help="Run script in interactive mode",)
    args = parser.parse_args()
    if not args.funcs:
        args.funcs = [funcs[task] for task in
                      ('createCsv', 'resizeImage', 'optimiseImage', 'dimensionIssues')]
    return args

if __name__ == '__main__':
    lists = analyseImages()

    if not lists:
        sys.exit('No jpegs found')

    args = parse_args(lists)   
    statusTable(lists)    
    for func, args in args.funcs:
        func(args)
share|improve this answer
    
This does seem like a better solution overall but the answer I accepted solved my issue. A bit more detail, im not just calling func1() its more like func1(lists['file_list']) which doesn't seem to play nicely with your suggestion. i can re-edit the question to make it clearer. –  d.learious Jan 17 '13 at 9:36
    
Ok, that's fine. If you are curious how to "prepare" a function with preset arguments, look into functools.partial. If you'd like me to take a look at your re-edited question, please leave a comment directed "@unutbu" so the system will notify me. –  unutbu Jan 17 '13 at 11:27
    
ive added an update to my question taking into account your suggestion. thanks for the help and link to functools.partial. im ready to accept your answer unless you have any other improvements to suggest. @unutbu –  d.learious Jan 18 '13 at 14:44
    
@d.learious: Your code will work just fine. However, it now occurs to me that there is a way to do this without functools.partial which I think looks a bit prettier. I've edited my post, above, to show what I mean. –  unutbu Jan 18 '13 at 19:34
    
i've accepted this answer as it gives me a lot more suggestions to take forward and improve my program. thanks for the help @unutbu –  d.learious Jan 19 '13 at 10:55
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Is that what you want?

if args.list:
    func1()
if args.interactive:
    func2()
if args.dimensions:
    func3()
if not any(vars(args).values()):
    func1()
    func2()
    func3()

(Thanks @J.F.Sebastian for the any version)

share|improve this answer
    
No, because perhaps both list and interactive are valid options, and then two functions need to be called. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 16 '13 at 12:46
    
Hi Martijn that is correct, thats why i stayed away from the elif route –  d.learious Jan 16 '13 at 12:50
    
Another version, would that work, @d.learious? –  pythonm Jan 16 '13 at 12:57
    
Hi thats perfect, solves my issue. I'll make sure to look into the meaning of filter(None, vars(args).values()): –  d.learious Jan 16 '13 at 13:22
4  
if not any(vars(args).values()): –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 18 '13 at 21:28
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