Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does a System.Timers.Timer elapse on a separate thread than the thread that created it?

Lets say I have a class with a timer that fires every 5 seconds. When the timer fires, in the elapsed method, some object is modified. Lets say it takes a long time to modify this object, like 10 seconds. Is it possible that I will run into thread collisions in this scenario?

share|improve this question
    
This could lead to problems. Note that, in general, threadpool threads are not designed for long-running processes. –  Greg D Sep 16 '09 at 22:58
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

MSDN Documentation on Timers states:

The System.Threading.Timer class makes callbacks on a ThreadPool thread and does not use the event model at all.

So indeed the timer elapses on a different thread.

share|improve this answer
11  
True, but that is a completely different class. The OP asked about the System.Timers.Timer class. –  Brian Gideon Sep 17 '09 at 1:38
    
Oh, you're right. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timers.timer.aspx says "The Elapsed event is raised on a ThreadPool thread." Same conclusion from there I suppose. –  Joren Sep 17 '09 at 11:55
2  
Well, yeah, but it is not quite that simple. See my answer. –  Brian Gideon Sep 17 '09 at 12:36
add comment

It depends. The System.Timers.Timer has two modes of operation.

If SynchronizingObject is set to an ISynchronizeInvoke instance then the Elapsed event will execute on the thread hosting the synchronizing object. Usually these ISynchronizeInvoke instances are none other than plain old Control and Form instances that we are all familiar with. So in that case the Elapsed event is invoked on the UI thread and it behaves similar to the System.Windows.Forms.Timer. Otherwise, it really depends on the specific ISynchronizeInvoke instance that was used.

If SynchronizingObject is null then the Elapsed event is invoked on a ThreadPool thread and it behaves similar to the System.Threading.Timer. In fact, it actually uses a System.Threading.Timer behind the scenes and does the marshaling operation after it receives the timer callback if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, thank you for this. –  Ben Parsons Aug 1 '12 at 8:18
3  
If you wanted the timer callback to execute on a new thread, should you use a System.Threading.Timer or System.Timers.Timer? –  CJ7 Oct 7 '12 at 0:09
    
@cj7: Either one can do that. –  Brian Gideon Oct 8 '12 at 19:12
    
and if I have a list of complex type (person) and want to have a time inside each person? I need this running on the same thread (all persons), because if it calls the first person method, the second person must wait until the first ends the elapsed event. Can I do that? –  Leandro De Mello Fagundes Jan 31 at 14:30
add comment

If the elapsed event takes longer then the interval, it will create another thread to raise the elapsed event. But there is a workaround for this

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)    
{     
   try
   {
      timer.Stop(); 
      Thread.Sleep(2000);        
      Debug.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);    
   }
   finally
   {
     timer.Start();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Each elapsed event will fire in the same thread unless a previous Elapsed is still running.

So it handles the collision for you

try putting this in a console

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Debug.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    var timer = new Timer(1000);
    timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
    timer.Start();
    Console.ReadLine();
}

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Thread.Sleep(2000);
    Debug.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
}

you will get something like this

10
6
12
6
12

where 10 is the calling thread and 6 and 12 are firing from the bg elapsed event. If you remove the Thread.Sleep(2000); you will get something like this

10
6
6
6
6

Since there are no collisions.

But this still leaves u with a problem. if u are firing the event every 5 seconds and it takes 10 seconds to edit u need some locking to skip some edits.

share|improve this answer
2  
Adding a timer.Stop() at the beginning of the Elapsed event method and then a timer.Start() at the end of the Elapsed event method will keep the Elapsed event from colliding. –  Metro Smurf Nov 30 '11 at 19:41
add comment

For System.Timers.Timer, on separate thread, if SynchronizingObject is not set.

    static System.Timers.Timer DummyTimer = null;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {

            Console.WriteLine("Main Thread Id: " + System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            DummyTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(1000 * 5); // 5 sec interval
            DummyTimer.Enabled = true;
            DummyTimer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(OnDummyTimerFired);
            DummyTimer.AutoReset = true;

            DummyTimer.Start();

            Console.WriteLine("Hit any key to exit");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
        catch (Exception Ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Ex.Message);
        }

        return;
    }

    static void OnDummyTimerFired(object Sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
        return;
    }

Output you'd see if DummyTimer fired on 5 seconds interval:

Main Thread Id: 9
   12
   12
   12
   12
   12
   ... 

So, as seen, OnDummyTimerFired is executed on Workers thread.

No, further complication - If you reduce interval to say 10 ms,

Main Thread Id: 9
   11
   13
   12
   22
   17
   ... 

This is because if prev execution of OnDummyTimerFired isn't done when next tick is fired, then .NET would create a new thread to do this job.

Complicating things further, "The System.Timers.Timer class provides an easy way to deal with this dilemma—it exposes a public SynchronizingObject property. Setting this property to an instance of a Windows Form (or a control on a Windows Form) will ensure that the code in your Elapsed event handler runs on the same thread on which the SynchronizingObject was instantiated."

(We love complicate things don't we? All that's needed is a god damn timer - First Rule when you teach Design Patterns should be "Simplicity")

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164015.aspx#S2

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.