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I'm trying to parse an OID and extract the #18 but I am unsure on how to write it to count Right to Left using a dot as a delimiter:

1.3.6.1.2.1.31.1.1.1.18.10035

This regex will grab the last value

my $ifindex = ($_=~ /^.*[.]([^.]*)$/);

I haven't found a way to tweak it to get the value I need yet.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you need is simpler:

my $ifindex;

if (/(\d+)\.\d+$/)
{
   $ifindex = $1;
}

A couple of comments:

  1. You don't need to match the entire string, only the part you care about. Thus, no need to anchor to the beginning with ^ and use .*. Anchor to the end only.
  2. [.] is a character class, intended for matching groups of characters. e.g., [abc] will match either a, b, or c. It should be avoided when matching a single character; just match that character instead. In this case you do need to escape it, since it is a special character: \..
  3. I have assumed based on your example that all of the terms have to be numbers. Hence, I used \d+ for the terms.
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How about:

my $str = "1.3.6.1.2.1.31.1.1.1.18.10035";
say ((split(/\./, $str))[-2]);

output:

18
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Split is the absolutely the correct way to do this –  preaction Jan 16 '13 at 19:38
    
@preaction, split is certainly an acceptable approach, but I wouldn't call it "absolutely the correct way". When you only need a single value out of the string, a regex would be faster and use less memory. –  dan1111 Jan 17 '13 at 8:27
    
Except that regular expressions are more difficult to read and thus more prone to bugs. Performance (at this level) is rarely a concern; if it was you'd use index() and substr(). –  preaction Jan 19 '13 at 21:36
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If the format is always the same (ie. always second from right) then you can either use:-

m/(\d+)\.\d+$/;

..and the answer will end up in: $1

Or a different approach would be to split the string into an array on the dots and examine the penultimate value in the array.

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TIL the definition of penultimate - Excellent! –  Buggabill Jan 16 '13 at 13:45
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my $ifindex = ($_=~ /^.*[.]([^.]*)[.][^.]*$/);
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