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I have problems while trying to find some strings in large input with new line characters using Python 2.7.3 regular expressions. I have something like this:

type="thing" blahblahblah
something id="123456"
...
type="disabled thing" blahblahblah
somethingelse id="123457"
...

I want to get all the ids where type="thing". Because of the greedy regex engine, I have to write a regex like:

r'type="thing"(?!type).+id="[0-9]{6,7}"', re.S

However, this doesn't work. How do I make an exclude-string regex with this kind of data on input?

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So, do you need type="disabled thing"? –  ATOzTOA Jan 16 '13 at 13:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understand your question (before it was edited) correctly, you want both lines that are associated with an id. In that case, you will need something along these lines (assuming new lines are marked by '\n'):

>>> import re
>>> t = """
type="thing" blahblahblah
something id="123456"
...
type="disabled thing" blahblahblah
somethingelse id="123457"
...
"""
>>> q = re.compile(r'type="thing".*\n.*\n')
>>> q.findall(t)
['type="thing" blahblahblah\nsomething id="123456"\n']
>>> for s in q.findall(t):
    print s  

type="thing" blahblahblah
something id="123456"

If you don't use re.S, you can more efficiently control the greediness of your expression. Your .+ combined with re.S will make your expression greedy, which you will otherwise have to account for. You could also use something like .+?. The question mark after the plus sign would make your expression not greedy, but I would opt for a more concise expression.

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I didn't notice header of each block has fixed number of lines... Thank you, this works! –  Norrius Jan 16 '13 at 13:50
    
Glad it worked. –  Justin Barber Jan 16 '13 at 14:00
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Use this:

r'type="thing"[\s\S]+?id="([0-9]{6,7})"', re.S

Example:

import re

s = b'''"type="thing" blahblahblah
something id="123456"
....
type="thing" blahblahblah
something id="123459"
....
type="disabled thing" blahblahblah
somethingelse id="123457"'''

expr = re.compile(r'type="thing"[\s\S]+?id="([0-9]{6,7})"', re.S);

c = expr.findall(s)

for c1 in c:
    print ".."
    print c1

Output:

>>> 
..
123456
..
123459
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Could you explain what the '?' sign in '[\s\S]*?' does? –  Norrius Jan 16 '13 at 13:56
    
It matches all characters including newline. I was trying to stop the greediness, but aparently didn't work... needed +?. –  ATOzTOA Jan 16 '13 at 14:00
    
I'm curious why you chose [\s\S] instead of simply a dot (.). –  Justin Barber Jan 16 '13 at 14:03
    
I used it without the re.S and just kept it... –  ATOzTOA Jan 16 '13 at 14:04
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