Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question is not about how to use Enumerators in Ruby 1.9.1 but rather I am curious how they work. Here is some code:

class Bunk
  def initialize
    @h = [*1..100]
  end

  def each
    if !block_given?
      enum_for(:each)
    else
      0.upto(@h.length) { |i|
        yield @h[i]
      }
    end
  end
end

In the above code I can use e = Bunk.new.each, and then e.next, e.next to get each successive element, but how exactly is it suspending execution and then resuming at the right spot?

I am aware that if the yield in the 0.upto is replaced with Fiber.yield then it's easy to understand, but that is not the case here. It is a plain old yield, so how does it work?

I looked at enumerator.c but it's neigh on incomprehensible for me. Maybe someone could provide an implementation in Ruby, using fibers, not 1.8.6 style continuation-based enumerators, that makes it all clear?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here's a plain ruby enumerator that uses Fibers and should pretty much behave like the original:

class MyEnumerator
  include Enumerable

  def initialize(obj, iterator_method)
    @f = Fiber.new do
      obj.send(iterator_method) do |*args|
        Fiber.yield(*args)
      end
      raise StopIteration
    end
  end

  def next
    @f.resume
  end

  def each
    loop do
      yield self.next
    end
  rescue StopIteration
    self
  end
end

And before someone complains about exceptions as flow control: The real Enumerator raises StopIteration at the end, too, so I just emulated the original behaviour.

Usage:

>> enum = MyEnumerator.new([1,2,3,4], :each_with_index)
=> #<MyEnumerator:0x9d184f0 @f=#<Fiber:0x9d184dc>
>> enum.next
=> [1, 0]
>> enum.next
=> [2, 1]
>> enum.to_a
=> [[3, 2], [4, 3]]
share|improve this answer

I think this would be more accurate. Calling each on the enumerator should be the same as calling the original iterator method. So I would slightly change the original solution to this:

class MyEnumerator
  include Enumerable

   def initialize(obj, iterator_method)
    @f = Fiber.new do
      @result = obj.send(iterator_method) do |*args|
       Fiber.yield(*args)
      end
      raise StopIteration
    end
   end

   def next(result)
     @f.resume result
   end

   def each
     result = nil
     loop do
      result = yield(self.next(result))
     end
     @result
   end
end
share|improve this answer

As the other posters noted, I believe it creates its own private "fiber" [in 1.9]. In 1.8.7 (or 1.8.6 if you use the backports gem) somehow or other it does the same thing (perhaps because all threads in 1.8 are the equivalent of fibers, it just uses them?)

Thus in 1.9 and 1.8.x, if you chain several of them together a.each_line.map.each_with_index { }

It actually flows through that whole chain with each line, kind of like a pipe on the command line

http://pragdave.blogs.pragprog.com/pragdave/2007/12/pipelines-using.html

HTH.

share|improve this answer
1  
here is a great detailed description wiki.github.com/rdp/ruby_tutorials_core/enumerator –  rogerdpack Nov 30 '09 at 19:47

Actually in your e = Bunk.new.each the else clause is not executed initially. Instead the 'if !block_given' clause executes and returns an enumerator object. The enumerator object does keep a fiber object internally. (At least that is what it looks like in enumerator.c)

When you call e.each it is calling a method on an enumerator which uses a fiber internally to keep track of its execution context. This method calls the Bunk.each method using the fibers execution context. The Bunk.each call here does execut the else clause and yields up the value.

I do not know how yield is implemented or how a fiber tracks the execution context. I haven't looked at that code. Almost all of the enumerator and fiber magic is implemented in C.

Are you really asking how fibers and yield are implemented? What level of detail are you looking for?

If I am off base please correct me.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer. yes I am asking for quite a lot of detail on this. specifically i would like to know if it is possible to implement it all in Ruby or whether there is something sneaky going on in C that is not possible in Ruby. If it is possible to implement it purely in Ruby, i'd love to see the code! :) –  banister Sep 17 '09 at 1:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.