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I want to cut the lines of /etc/passwd of users of the same group.

If my group have the uid 1009 I want all the lines of /etc/passwd of this group

user1:x:1001:1009::/home/user1:/bin/bash
user2:x:1002:1009::/home/user2:/bin/bash
user3:x:1003:1009::/home/user3:/bin/bash

I tried cat /etc/passwd | grep 1009 but it doesn't work because the number 1009 can be also a uid or other number.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use awk to compare the forth field against the uid you want using the field separator :

$ awk -F: '$4==1009' /etc/passwd
user1:x:1001:1009::/home/user1:/bin/bash
user2:x:1002:1009::/home/user2:/bin/bash
user3:x:1003:1009::/home/user3:/bin/bash
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Thanks!! It worked –  user1984093 Jan 16 '13 at 15:26
cat /etc/passwd | egrep '([^:]+:){3}1009:'

"Three lots of (some not-colons then a colon), followed by 1009 then another colon."

(You need the trailing colon to omit group 10090.)

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That works too! Thanks –  user1984093 Jan 16 '13 at 15:32
    
Why are you concatenating (cat) the input file with nothing and then piping the result to grep instead of just having grep work directly on the file? –  Ed Morton Jan 16 '13 at 17:07
    
Indeed looks like an UUOC ^^ (But there could be "readability" reasons: best reason I read so far was someone pointing out it allow to read the command following the flow of information, instead of having the source (here, the file) at the end of the first command...) (and that's probably this reason that is the source of so many UUOC's out there. I do it too, sometimes, as when not thinking about efficiency it seems more "natural", even though it creates subprocesses and pipes and buffering...) –  Olivier Dulac Jan 16 '13 at 17:57
    
@EdMorton: Just because that's how the OP expressed his question. But now that I think about it, I agree with Olivier. –  RichieHindle Jan 17 '13 at 9:08
    
@OlivierDulac If you just want to specify the file name on the left side of the command instead of the right you can do </etc/passwd egrep '([^:]+:){3}1009:', still no need for a separate command and pipe. Personally I still wouldn't as it feels unnatural but maybe I've just gotten used to having the command first. Hey, I just realised your argument doesn't make sense as you STILL have the command first but now the command is cat instead of egrep! –  Ed Morton Jan 17 '13 at 12:40

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