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According to wikipedia's ISO-8601 article (I know, bad source)...

If no UTC relation information is given with a time representation, the time is assumed to be in local time.

So, for example.. given:

  • var a = Date.parse("2012-03-21");
  • var b = Date.parse("2012-03-21T00:00");
  • var c = Date.parse("2012-03-21T00:00Z");

I would expect "a" and "b" to be local time (the browser's time zone) while "c" is UTC. However, a, b, and c are all equivalent (1332288000000). All values are parsed as UTC.

The ECMAScript specification also clearly states this:

15.9.1.15 Date Time String Format

The value of an absent time zone offset is "Z".

Why is there this discrepancy? Is wikipedia incorrect or the ECMAScript spec? How would one parse an ISO-8601 string into local time in the browser (without knowing the browser's time zone) ?

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well, perhaps the browsers timezone actually is UTC? –  Christoph Jan 16 '13 at 15:29
    
Strange comment. No, it's EST. –  nogridbag Jan 16 '13 at 15:36
    
what's so strange about this comment, if you are in UK, your localtime and utc yield the same result... –  Christoph Jan 16 '13 at 16:52
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1 Answer

How would one parse an ISO-8601 string into local time in the browser (without knowing the browser's time zone) ?

Use the toLocaleString method to do this:

var foo = new Date("2012-03-21").toLocaleString()
var bar = new Date("2012-03-21T00:00").toLocaleString()
var baz = new Date("2012-03-21T00:00Z").toLocaleString()
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