Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let p = let x = 1 in x + 1, let y = 2 in y + 1, 4

Since comma , have the lowest precedence, I would image p has 3 elements: (2, 3, 4).

But in fact, p has only 2 elements: (2, (3, 4))

Why?

Why the last , belongs to let y expression, but not outside of it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would expect let...in... to have the following syntax

let binding = expression in expression

and the block goes as far to the right as possible.

In your example, the OCaml parser expects

let y = 2 in y + 1, 4

to be an expression and parses it as (3, 4) successfully.

An equivalent of your example with explicit brackets is

let p = (let x = 1 in x + 1, (let y = 2 in y + 1, 4))

If you would like to return final result (2, 3, 4), you should put a bracket to stop let...in... block in the appropriate place:

let p = let x = 1 in x + 1, (let y = 2 in y + 1), 4
share|improve this answer

Try writing out on multiple lines, with indentation to show the relationship:

let p = 
    let x = 1 in x + 1, 
        let y = 2 in y + 1, 4

So you can see how one let "belongs" to another.

(2, (3,4)) is exactly what I'd expect.

share|improve this answer
2  
thanks, but I don't think you have explained the root. I mean the deep inside reason –  Jackson Tale Jan 16 '13 at 16:28
    
Does let y = 2 in y + 1, 4 belong to let x expression? –  Jackson Tale Jan 16 '13 at 16:31
    
Yes it does, although I may phrase it a bit differently. But that is the deep inside reason, and the reason I wrote it out with indentation was to allow the structure to reveal that reason. I added a bit more to my answer, to hopefully make it more useful. –  RonaldBarzell Jan 16 '13 at 16:36
    
thank you @ronalbarzell –  Jackson Tale Jan 16 '13 at 16:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.