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I'm migrating from WindowsAzure.StorageClient 1.7 to WindowsAzure.Storage 2.0, and I'm working right now on the management of the exceptions. Following this guide and other sources, I found out I had to migrate from

try
{
    // Something
}
catch (StorageClientException e)
{
    switch (e.ErrorCode)
    {
        case StorageErrorCode.ContainerNotFound:
        case StorageErrorCode.ResourceNotFound:
        case StorageErrorCode.BlobNotFound:
        case StorageErrorCode.ConditionFailed:
            // Do something
    }
}

to

try
{
    // Something
}
catch (StorageException e)
{
    switch (e.RequestInformation.ExtendedErrorInformation.ErrorCode)
    {
        case StorageErrorCodeStrings.ContainerNotFound:
        case StorageErrorCodeStrings.ResourceNotFound:
        case BlobErrorCodeStrings.BlobNotFound:
        case StorageErrorCodeStrings.ConditionNotMet:
            // Do something
    }
}

Looks simple. The problem is ExtendedErrorInformation is always equal to null. The HttpStatusMessage instead says 'The specified blob does not exist.', as it should.

I thought it was caused by the simulator of the test environment, but trying it in a real Azure environment drived me to the same situation.

Any idea?

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According to the documentation, Extended Error Information should not be relied upon for code logic - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Russ Cam Jan 20 at 9:50

2 Answers 2

Another option is to look at the RequestInformation.HttpStatusCode instead. This seems to be more reliable anyway. Your code translates rather easily to:

try
{
    // Something
}
catch (StorageException e)
{
    switch (e.RequestInformation.HttpStatusCode)
    {
        case (int)HttpStatusCode.NotFound:
        case (int)HttpStatusCode.PreconditionFailed:
        // Do something
    }
}
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Yes, I knew that status code, but it's way too much generic for my purposes. I needed the 'power' given by the error code strings of Azure, to take different actions. I managed to take the string from the HttpStatusMessage and comparing it with the Azure ones to return the code. @Gaurav in the other reply was correct, the problem is only with the FetchAttributes, for what I've seen. –  Mattia Vitturi Jan 21 '13 at 13:17

I just tried it and was surprised to see that indeed the ExtendedErrorInformation object is null. However it's not always null. For example, if I try to create a blob container which already exists using blobContainer.Create() method, I will get a non-null ExtendedErrorInformation. However if I try and fetch attributes of a blob which does not exist in the blob container, I will get a null ExtendedErrorInformation object. I guess one can't just assume that ExtendedErrorInformation object will always be available.

Also I noticed that in your code for 2.0, you're using StorageErrorCodeStrings. Please note that it is removed from 2.0 and is available only available with version 1.8 or before. Thought I should mention that

Update: Please see comment below from @VollmonD. This has been added in version 2.0.3.

share|improve this answer
1  
StorageErrorCodeStrings has been added in 2.0.3, I got the packages via nuget. The FetchAttributes is one of the situations where I got the problem. Now I'm trying to see if I can use the error code strings to get the error message and compare it to the HttpStatus. Thank you for your blog entry, it helped me a lot during these migration days :) –  Mattia Vitturi Jan 16 '13 at 17:42
    
My bad! I didn't know that the storage team included this back. I need to go back and update the post on exception handling :). I'm glad you liked my blog posts. –  Gaurav Mantri Jan 16 '13 at 17:49

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