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Will GHC transform an expression with intermediate values as efficiently as one without?

e.g.

main = print $ f ["aa", "bb", "cc"]

f x = 
   let a = map (map toUpper) x
       b = filter (\z -> 'C' /= head z) a
       c = foldl1 (++) b
   in c

seems to have very different core output (with -ddump-simple) than with

f x = foldl1 (++) $ filter (\z -> 'C' /= head z) $ map (map toUpper) x

Could an expression with intermediate values take (significantly) longer to evaluate?

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Note this is using build/foldr fusion, as you are using the default GHC list implementation. Use the stream-fusion package if you want the stream version. The benefit will be that the foldl1 fuses. –  Don Stewart Jan 16 '13 at 18:24
    
Both versions give the same core for me, with 7.6.1 and 7.2.2 (using -O and -O2). What version and optimisation flags did you use? –  Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '13 at 18:33
    
@DanielFischer: I didn't use any optimization flags; what I was wondering was "when are these non-equivalent," and it looks like the answer is "when not using optimization flags." –  amindfv Jan 16 '13 at 18:45
2  
@amindfv No optimisation basically means "transliterate what has been written". That's never a good idea. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '13 at 18:47
    
Without optimizations on, the rewrite rules optimizations won't be enabled. –  Don Stewart Jan 16 '13 at 18:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Linear use of intermediate let bindings is equivalent to putting (.) between the values.

GHC will fuse through such pipelines. You can see from the results of -ddump-simpl-stats

With let Bindings:

15 RuleFired
    1 ++
    1 Class op /=
    1 Class op show
    1 Class op showList
    1 filter
    1 fold/build
    1 foldr/app
    1 map
    1 neChar#->case
    3 unpack
    3 unpack-list

Using a pipeline:

15 RuleFired
    1 ++
    1 Class op /=
    1 Class op show
    1 Class op showList
    1 filter
    1 fold/build
    1 foldr/app
    1 map
    1 neChar#->case
    3 unpack
    3 unpack-list

And the same fused worker:

With let Bindings:

Main.main_go =
  \ (ds_aAz :: [[GHC.Types.Char]]) ->
    case ds_aAz of _ {
      [] -> GHC.Types.[] @ [GHC.Types.Char];
      : y_aAE ys_aAF ->
        case GHC.Base.map
               @ GHC.Types.Char @ GHC.Types.Char GHC.Unicode.toUpper y_aAE
        of wild1_azI {
          [] ->
            GHC.List.badHead
            `cast` (UnsafeCo (forall a_azK. a_azK) [[GHC.Types.Char]]
                    :: (forall a_azK. a_azK) ~ [[GHC.Types.Char]]);
          : x_azM ds1_azN ->
            case x_azM of _ { GHC.Types.C# c2_aAa ->
            case c2_aAa of _ {
              __DEFAULT ->
                GHC.Types.: @ [GHC.Types.Char] wild1_azI (Main.main_go ys_aAF);
              'C' -> Main.main_go ys_aAF
            }

Pipeline:

Main.main_go =
  \ (ds_aAA :: [[GHC.Types.Char]]) ->
    case ds_aAA of _ {
      [] -> GHC.Types.[] @ [GHC.Types.Char];
      : y_aAF ys_aAG ->
        case GHC.Base.map
               @ GHC.Types.Char @ GHC.Types.Char GHC.Unicode.toUpper y_aAF
        of wild1_azB {
          [] ->
            GHC.List.badHead
            `cast` (UnsafeCo (forall a_azD. a_azD) [[GHC.Types.Char]]
                    :: (forall a_azD. a_azD) ~ [[GHC.Types.Char]]);
          : x_azF ds1_azG ->
            case x_azF of _ { GHC.Types.C# c2_aA3 ->
            case c2_aA3 of _ {
              __DEFAULT ->
                GHC.Types.: @ [GHC.Types.Char] wild1_azB (Main.main_go ys_aAG);
              'C' -> Main.main_go ys_aAG
            }
            }

Did you forget to compile with -O2 ?

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