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This should be an obvious one but I've not yet found an elegant solution. For various reasons, I need to create an immutable Scala map (scala.collection.immutable.Map from Scala 2.10), but I can only write Java code. How do I do this?

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He wants to create a scala map in java, not the opposite. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Jan 16 '13 at 18:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Wild guess - here goes nothing:

scala.collection.immutable.Map$.MODULE$.empty<…, …>()
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Do you really need to go through MODULE by hand? As far as I know there are forwarder static methods that already do this. Can't check right now though, I have no compiler at hand. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Jan 16 '13 at 18:35
    
That did the trick, thank you! –  SoftMemes Jan 16 '13 at 18:40
    
My bad, you do need to access Map$ instead of Map but accessing MODULE$ by hand is unnecessary. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Jan 16 '13 at 18:42
    
@Regis, according to my compiler, even the MODULE$ part is required, unfortunately. –  SoftMemes Jan 16 '13 at 18:46
    
Huh, weird. I'll have to check that. Sorry for the noise, I should try to refrain from posting without having a compiler at hand for verification. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Jan 16 '13 at 18:52

At first I was puzzled that just doing the following would fail:

scala.collection.immutable.Map<Integer, String> = scala.collection.immutable.Map$.<Integer, String>empty();

The reason it seemed odd is because I know for a fact that scala generates static forwarders that internally dereference MODULE$ and call the corresponding (non-static) method. I made some tests, and although what I found is somewhat tangential to the original question, it is still related and good to know.

Say we have the following:

package test
object MyScalaObject {
  def empty[A, B]: Map[A, B] = sys.error("TODO")
}

Using javap we can see that a static forwarder is generated:

public class test.MyScalaObject extends java.lang.Object{
    public static scala.collection.immutable.Map empty();
    public test.MyScalaObject();
}

And indeed we can in java just do the following:

scala.collection.immutable.Map<Integer, String> myMap = test.MyScalaObject.<Integer, String>empty();

All is well and nice. However, if we add a class or trait MyScalaObject that also defines a method with the same signature, no static forwarder is generated by scala (certainly because the JVM does not allow a class to define both a static and non-static method with the same signature). There are probably other different subtle situations that prevent the static forwarders to be generated.

Consider:

package test
class MyScalaObject {
  def empty[A, B]: Map[A, B] = sys.error("TODO")
}
object MyScalaObject {
  def empty[A, B]: Map[A, B] = sys.error("TODO TOO")
}

javap shows that the static forwarder has indeed disappeared:

public class test.MyScalaObject extends java.lang.Object{
    public scala.collection.immutable.Map empty();
    public test.MyScalaObject();
}

In this case it means that we have to explictly dereference $MODULE which points to the (unique) instance of the singleton object:

scala.collection.immutable.Map<Integer, String> myMap = test.MyScalaObject$.MODULE$.<Integer, String>empty();

As it turns out, both the trait scala.collection.immutable.Map and its companion object define a parameterless empty method, so we stumble upon this very issue.

The moral is that while static forwarders are a potentially useful feature, it is also very fragile because the mere fact of modifying a class (in this case adding an empty method in class MyScalaObject) can break the feature, without even touching its companion object itself. It is thus certainly a good idea to always explicitly reference MODULE$ (as in Wilfred Springer's answer) even if it looks less nice and even if the static forwarder is currently present, to prevent potential breakage when updating to a newer version of the library.

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1  
Great follow-up! –  Wilfred Springer Jan 21 '13 at 8:03

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