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typedef struct list
{
    struct list * next;
    int val;
}*list_t;    

list_t add(list_t l,int e)
{
    list_t head;

    if(l == NULL)
    {
        l = malloc(sizeof(list_t));
        l->val = e;
        l->next = NULL;
        return l;
    }       

    head = l;

    while(l != NULL)
        l=l->next;

    l = malloc(sizeof(list_t));

    l->val = e;

    l->next = NULL;

    return head;
}

Sample driver:

int main()
{
    list_t ints=NULL;
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<156;i+=2)
        ints = add(ints,i);

    while(ints->next != NULL)
    {   
        printf("%d\n",ints->val);
        ints=ints->next;
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Program works, but "add" function rewinds the list so that the body of main's loop is never achieved.It surprised me a lot, because I thought that I'd been passing list as a value! Could you explain this phenomenom?

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Change the sizeof to this: sizeof(*list_t) –  imreal Jan 16 '13 at 18:25
    
And use double pointer: list_t add(list_t *l,int e) –  imreal Jan 16 '13 at 18:26
    
... or don't hide pointers behind typedefs. BTW: the form l = malloc(sizeof *l); will always work. –  wildplasser Jan 16 '13 at 18:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is not that the add function rewinds the list, is that it's not working at all: Nowhere in your code are you stating that the previous end of the list should link to the newly added element.

I've modified it slightly:

typedef struct list
{
    struct list * next;
    int val;
} list_t;    

list_t *add(list_t *l,int e)
{
    list_t *head;

    if(l == NULL)
    {
        l = malloc(sizeof(list_t));
        l->val = e;
        l->next = NULL;
        return l;
    }       

    head = l;

    while(l->next != NULL)
        l=l->next;

    l->next = malloc(sizeof(list_t));

    l=l->next;

    l->val = e;

    l->next = NULL;

    return head;
}

int main()
{
    list_t *ints=NULL;
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<156;i+=2)
        ints = add(ints,i);

    while(ints->next != NULL)
    {   
        printf("%d\n",ints->val);
        ints=ints->next;
    }

    return 0;
}

The code now works as expected.

Remember that l is a local variable in the add function. Any changes made to l will be lost if it's not allowed to leave the scope of the function somehow (like you do when you return it, inside the first if). Changes made to the variable l points to, using either the * or the -> operators, will be effective to whoever has access to that variable.

I recomend that you start reading on debugging techniques. They vary depending on your environment, and can go from cryptic commandline tools like gdb to full-fledged graphical object browsers and such. This way you will be able to see what happens step by step and monitor memory changes and check what's really being stored in your variables.

EDIT: Fixed pointer trouble as commented. Memory allocations now provide for the whole struct variable, and pointers are no longer used implicitly.

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Why have you edited struct definition? malloc(sizeof(struct list)) wouldn't be sufficient? Or simply malloc(sizeof(*l)) –  0x6B6F77616C74 Jan 16 '13 at 19:32
    
I removed the implicit pointer for clarity. In case you want to revert to the original definition, you can. In that case, you should replace the mallocs with any of the suggestions you point out. –  Martín Valdés de León Jan 16 '13 at 19:56
l = malloc(sizeof(list_t));

that allocate a pointer to the struct, not the struct itself. for example, on a 64 bit machine, the malloced size is 8, but it's supposed to be 16.

when you subsequently say

l->val = ..
l->next = ..

only God knows where you are writing to..

Go search some sample code of linked list, and read it through, I mean in the debugger.

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Avoid the special cases. The add() function can do only one thing: allocate a list node and assign its pointer value to the first node in the chain that happens to be null. There is no difference between a NULL node at the head of the chain, in the middle, or at the tail. (of course null nodes cannot exist in the middle of the list. They can exist at the head of the list, but then the list would be empty) Find the first NULL and put the fresh node there.

struct list *add(struct list *lp, int e)
{
    struct list **pp;

    for (pp= &lp; *pp; pp = &(*pp)->next) {;}

    *pp = malloc(sizeof **pp);
    (*pp)->val = e;
    (*pp)->next = NULL;

    return lp;
}
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