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I have the following code:

 $st2 = quotemeta($st);
 if ( $line =~ m/$st2\z/ ) {
     print "GOOD\n";
 }
 else {
     print "BAAAAAAD\n";
 }

The $line I get it from a file. I read the entire file and then do a:

foreach $line in @file {...}

For me it only prints BAAAAAAD. Also, $line can contain "clear", "clearer", "clearest" or some other words but I want to match all "clear" instances, afterwords I want to match all "clearer" instances and so on. NOTE: "clear" should not match "clearer" or "clearest". It should only match "clear"

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5 Answers 5

First, if you go through a file for searching, don't read it entirely, but search line by line. You also don't need to use quotemeta, unless you want to search for plain strings only. If you want to find the word "clear" anywhere in the line, leave out \z in your search pattern. And finally, your string contains the final newline, which prevents \z from seeing the end of string. Use chomp for removing the trailing newline

my $st = 'clear';
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    if (m/$st\z/) {
        print "GOOD\n";
    } else {
        print "BAAAAAAD\n";
    }
}

See perlre for an explanation of perl's regular expression

\z Match only at end of string

If you want to search for plain strings only anywhere in the line, you can just use index

my $st = 'clear';
while (<>) {
    if (index($_, $st) != -1/) {
        print "GOOD\n";
    } else {
        print "BAAAAAAD\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually I used to do it with index, but index matches "clear" on "clearer" too, and I need it to match just "clear". –  user1984646 Jan 16 '13 at 21:45
    
@user1984646 From your question, I thought you wanted to find anything containing "clear"? –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 16 '13 at 21:50
    
You are right, I was not clear enough –  user1984646 Jan 17 '13 at 2:09

If you want to match an exact word, use \b for word boundaries. E.g. /\bclear\b/ matches clear but it doesn't match clearer. This is useful when the word you are looking for isn't the only word in the string.

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Yes, you answer also works. I found the solution with "eq" on another site and i though it would be good to have that here too, but your solution also works and it would have worked better with my code, but now I already modified everything. Thank you :) –  user1984646 Jan 17 '13 at 17:46

Try using qr($your_var)
There is a useful link right here:
http://perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Regexp-Quote-Like-Operators

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is what works:

my $var1 = "clear";
my $var2 = "clear";
if ($var2 eq $var1) {
    print "match\n";
}
else {
    print "no match\n";
}

This also works (shows "no match") when $var1 is "clearer".

Thank you all for your help.

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You could use word boundries, the following snippet will match all lines matching "clear", "clearer" or "clearest", clearly telling you what it matched

my @matches = qw/clear clearer clearest/;

for $line ( @lines ) {
  for ( @matches ) {
    print "GOOD: Matches $_" if $line =~ /\b$_\b/;
  }
}

When i run this against an input like this:

my @lines = ( 'clear', 'clearer', 'clearest', 'clear', 'clearer' );

The output is:

GOOD: Matches clear 
GOOD: Matches clearer 
GOOD: Matches clearest 
GOOD: Matches clear 
GOOD: Matches clearer

This will also work if clear is part of a bigger sentence in the line

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but I would like it to only match clear, not the rest. I figured out the solution in the end. –  user1984646 Jan 17 '13 at 17:36

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