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   #include<stdio.h>
   #include<conio.h>
   void sstring();
    int main()
    {
     char ch1[10],ch2;
     printf("Enter the value of first character : ");
     scanf("%s",&ch1);
     sstring(); 

     getch();
     return 0; 
    } 

    void sstring()
    {    char ch2;
         printf("Enter the value of second character : ");
         scanf("%c",&ch2);   

         printf("Got the second character"); 
    }

second scanf inside function does not work....program does not stop at second scanf ?

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1  
Note that although you declared sstring(), you did not specify a prototype for it. In C (but not C++), a declaration of the form sometype function(); declares the existence of a function which returns sometype but the argument list is not specified (but it is not a variable length argument list). To declare a function prototype for a function that takes no arguments, write sometype function(void);. For consistency, I recommend defining the function with the explicit (void) notation too. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '13 at 4:00
1  
Also, it is a good idea to check the return value from scanf(), to make sure it was successful. For example, you might use if (scanf("%9s", ch1) != 1) ...read failed.... Note the absence of an & on the array name. Technically, you're passing the address of an array (of type char (*)[10]), rather than the char * that scanf() expects. Your compiler should be warning about type mismatches; if it isn't, find out how to make it do so or get a better compiler. Then heed the warnings! –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '13 at 4:04
    
can you please suggest for me a good compiler for windows for c and c++ both...please share with me the link from where i could get it... –  kks Jan 17 '13 at 8:42
    
Well, I expect MSVC can be persuaded to offer comments like that, but GCC most certainly can. I've used Cygwin happily on Windows with GCC; there's also MinGW that can be used with GCC. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '13 at 14:21
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1 Answer

First, thats not because the second scanf is inside a function.

Thats because the 0xA (return) from the first scanf (you typed enter) is still in the stdin buffer. Note that the %s argument will not read the final "\n" on input. To not affect possible later calls to scanf you should always read both the string and the line delimiter.

char string[10], linedelim;
scanf("%s%c", string, &linedelim);

Here comes your example again, now working.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void sstring();
int main()
{
 char ch1[10],ch2, linedelim;
 printf("Enter the value of first character : ");
 // read both the string and line delim
 scanf("%s%s",&ch1, &linedelim);
 sstring(); 
 getch();
 return 0; 
} 

void sstring()
{    char ch2;
     printf("Enter the value of second character : ");
     // read the second input
     scanf("%c",&ch2);   
     printf("Got the second character"); 
}

Also note, that your example is very fragile as it can easily lead to a buffer overflow when the user inputs more than 10 chars. Imagine the following command line that can easily break your program:

$ perl -e 'print "A" x 1000000' | ./a.out 

A better way than using scanf() for reading a string from input might be using fgets() as you have control over the size of input.

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So after every scanf we need to put fflush?....i mean where to use fflush and where not? –  kks Jan 16 '13 at 18:52
    
@kks Forget about the fflush I've mentioned before. fflush() on a input stream will lead to undefined behaviour. Use just another scanf() to eat the newline –  hek2mgl Jan 16 '13 at 19:08
    
is there any other way to do the same ? i mean if there is some other function so the two scanf statement can be avoided and program runs correctly –  kks Jan 16 '13 at 19:09
    
Note that fflush() on an input stream has meaning in Windows, but not on Unix. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '13 at 4:02
    
@JonathanLeffler Yes, I realized this too. I'm not the 'every day use' C expert. But it's always interesting to achieve 'easy' tasks in C! :) –  hek2mgl Jan 17 '13 at 4:04
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