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I am trying to write a script which will count and erase empty lines from a file and save the changes in a new file:

if (@ARGV != 2) {
  print "Usage: $0 infile outfile\n";
  exit;
}
$infile = @ARGV[0];
$outfile = @ARGV[1];
open($old, "<$infile");
open($new, ">$outfile");
@mass = <$old>;
foreach $newc(@mass) {
    $counter++;
    if ($_ =~ /^$/) {
        print "blank line found in $old at line number $counter\n";
        print $new;
    }
}
close($new);
close($old);

But it's not working. Where am I going wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
What is the question? What is going wrong? –  squiguy Jan 16 '13 at 18:41
    
@ARGV[0] Works well, ive tested it out in other script before. My problem is that I can't remove these empty lines and Spaces of input file –  Rocker Jan 16 '13 at 18:56
1  
@array[$index] works, but it is not correct style. @array[...] is meant to return multiple indexes, like my @slice = @array[1,2,3,4,5]. Notice that the sigils match, @slice and @array start with the same character. This is why it is better to write my $item = $array[0] instead of my $item = @array[0]; –  preaction Jan 16 '13 at 19:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's another option:

use strict;
use warnings;

@ARGV == 2 or die "Usage: $0 infile outfile\n";

open my $fhIN,  '<', $ARGV[0] or die $!;
open my $fhOUT, '>', $ARGV[1] or die $!;

while (<$fhIN>) {
    if (/\S/) {
        print $fhOUT $_;
    }
    else {
        print "Blank at line $.\n";
    }
}

As amon showed, you can iterate over your file's lines without first reading them into an array. This script also takes advantage of $., which contains the file's current line number. The regex /\S/ checks for any non-whitespace characters in the line, as this indicates a non-blank line. If /\S/ is true, it writes the line to outfile, else it prints the blank-line notification.

The file handles are lexically scoped in the three-argument form of open (the preferred method), so the files will automatically close at the script's end.


You can even go a step further and take advantage of STDIN, STDOUT and STDERR for maximum flexibility and usefulness.

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>) {
    if (/\S/) {
        print;
    }
    else {
        print STDERRR "Blank at line $.\n";
    }
}

Then just use

script.pl file.in >file.out

instead of

script.pl file.in file.out

but it also allows you to do stuff like

prog1 | script.pl | prog2
share|improve this answer
    
Have to accept that this is working much better than the others, I had some bug with other codes which are posted here! Thanks –  Rocker Jan 16 '13 at 22:08
    
I hope you don't mind that I added a section to your answer showing how to simplify the program and make it more powerful and behave more like other programs at the same time. –  ikegami Jan 17 '13 at 7:10
    
@ikegami - Mind? No, not at all. I always appreciate your additions and modifications. I know it'll be good for the OP and I benefit, too. Thank you. –  Kenosis Jan 17 '13 at 21:04

The lines in @mass still contain a trailing newline. Either account for that in your regex, or chomp the values.

I would code the loop like

while (<$old>) {
  chomp;
  say {$new} $_ if length;
}

Also, test the return value of open:

open my $old, "<", $infile or die qq(Can't open "$infile": $!);

The whole code as a one-liner:

perl -nE'chomp; say if length' infile.txt >outfile.txt

or

perl -nE'chomp; if(length){say}else{say STDERR "blank on line $."}' infile.txt >outfile.txt

($. is the current input line number.)

share|improve this answer
    
He does account. /^$/ (unlike /^\z/) will match "\n". –  ikegami Jan 17 '13 at 2:54
    
btw, chomp can be replaced by -l, since -nl chomps. (Same goes for -pl.) –  ikegami Jan 17 '13 at 7:15

You don't use $newc in your loop and you print only the blank lines

foreach $newc (@mass) {
    $counter++;
    if ($newc =~ /^$/) {
        print "blank line found in $old at line number $counter\n";
    } else {
        print $new $newc;
    }
}

As already noted in the comments, use $ARGV[0] and $ARGV[1]. $ARGV[0] is the first value of @ARGV, whereas @ARGV[0] is a slice. See Slices for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
@Rocker Please see updated answer. –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 16 '13 at 19:18
    
Thanks! Im a beginner and seems we have bad teacher :D –  Rocker Jan 16 '13 at 19:23

Your script should be like this:

if (@ARGV != 2) {
  print "Usage: $0 infile outfile\n";
  exit;
}
$infile = $ARGV[0];
$outfile = $ARGV[1];
open $old, "<", $infile;
open $new, ">", $outfile;
@mass = <$old>;
$counter = 0;
foreach $newc (@mass) {
    $counter++;
    if ($newc =~ /^$/) {
        print "blank line found in $infile at line number $counter\n";
    } else { # print in the new file when not an empty line!
        print $new $newc;
    }
}
close($new);
close($old);
share|improve this answer
1  
why the down vote? the code works! someone wants to promote their answer?? –  xblitz Jan 16 '13 at 19:10
    
Reasons for downvote: (1) The answer contains almost no explanation. (2) It uses a somewhat outdated coding style; slightly off from current best practices: (2.1) global variables (2.2) forgetting the return value of open. (3) The solution still uses O(n) memory, where O(1) is enough. –  amon Jan 16 '13 at 19:24
    
The point of not using all the best practices is of course to modify his code minimally so he can see where the modifications are –  xblitz Jan 16 '13 at 19:27
    
@amon The difference between this and your answer is, the OP can see what he has done wrong. Whereas in your answer, he just learns how you would do it. –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 16 '13 at 19:38
if (@ARGV != 2) {
  print "Usage: $0 infile outfile\n";
  exit;
}

$infile = $ARGV[0];
$outfile = $ARGV[1];
open(OLD, "<$infile");
open(NEW, ">$outfile");
while ($line = <OLD>) {
    print NEW $line unless ($line =~ /^$/);
}
close(NEW);
close(OLD);
share|improve this answer
    
Why the down vote? The code works... –  Kansha Jan 16 '13 at 19:08
1  
Reasons for downvote: (1) The answer contains no explanation. (2) It uses horrid and outdated coding style; nowhere near current best practices: (2.1) global variables (2.2) bareword filehandles (2.3) two-arg form of open (2.4) forgetting the return value of open. –  amon Jan 16 '13 at 19:21
1  
This orignal question was for a quick and dirty perl script. This isn't a production app its a quick tool to do a task. Following coding practices on a 10 line script is just silly IMO. To each their own. –  Kansha Jan 16 '13 at 19:25
    
@amon When I apply these rules to your answer, I must downvote your answer as well. –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 16 '13 at 19:34
1  
Always use strict; use warnings;, regardless whether it's "...a quick and dirty perl script" or not. –  Kenosis Jan 16 '13 at 20:17

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