Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data file which looks roughly like this

# X  Y   Value
1    1   1.5
1    2   2.5
2    1   NaN
2    2   3.0

I want to create a scatter plot in Gnuplot with crosses at each point and a label with the value beside it.

set datafile missing "NaN"
plot "data.txt" using 1:2:3 with labels left, \
     "data.txt" using 1:2 with points

I would like to see a label with a literal string NaN for the points with an undefined value. Instead no label is printed. Is there a setting to force undefined values to be printed?

I tried this, but still no labels for undefined values:

plot "data.txt" using 1:2:(($3==$3) ? $3 : "NaN") with labels left

It looks like the undefined points are skipped altogether

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following works just fine for me (gnuplot 4.4 and gnuplot 4.6):

plot 'data.txt' u 1:2:3 w labels left,\
     'data.txt' u 1:2 w points

In fact, copy/pasting your original code works for me as well:

set datafile missing "NaN"
plot "data.txt" using 1:2:3 with labels left, \
     "data.txt" using 1:2 with points

Perhaps you're not noticing the labels because they are almost off the screen?

set xrange [0:3]
set yrange [0:3]

helps them to be a little easier to see...

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, shame on me. I dumbed down my example too much without testing it. There is a difference between using 1:2:3 (NaN is printed) and using 1:2:($3) and more complicated expressions where functions are called -- the functions are not even evaluated. Now I found out that valid(n) can be used for this: using 1:2:(valid(3) ? sprintf('%.0f', $3) : "NaN"). Thanks anyway, your answer helped me a lot! –  hfs Jan 17 '13 at 8:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.