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I have a CSV file, "value.txt" with the following content: the first few rows of the file are :

Date,"price","factor_1","factor_2"
2012-06-11,1600.20,1.255,1.548
2012-06-12,1610.02,1.258,1.554
2012-06-13,1618.07,1.249,1.552
2012-06-14,1624.40,1.253,1.556
2012-06-15,1626.15,1.258,1.552
2012-06-16,1626.15,1.263,1.558
2012-06-17,1626.15,1.264,1.572

In R we can read this file in using

price <- read.csv("value.txt")  

and that will return a data.frame which I can use for statistical operations:

> price <- read.csv("value.txt")
> price
     Date   price factor_1 factor_2
1  2012-06-11 1600.20    1.255    1.548
2  2012-06-12 1610.02    1.258    1.554
3  2012-06-13 1618.07    1.249    1.552
4  2012-06-14 1624.40    1.253    1.556
5  2012-06-15 1626.15    1.258    1.552
6  2012-06-16 1626.15    1.263    1.558
7  2012-06-17 1626.15    1.264    1.572

Is there a Pythonic way to get the same functionality?

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will you commend on what's special with is dataframe and what statistical operation can you do with it? –  LWZ Jan 16 '13 at 19:53
2  
dataframe is can contain more than one types of data , for example every column can be a list , and you can treat every list individually applying some functions on them , and talking about statistical operations , like having the mean , standard deviation , quartile , ... –  mazlor Jan 16 '13 at 20:29
    
Thanks! This is actually very useful to me. I've always load csv file with the csv module which gives me a list of lists. This data.frame sounds way better! –  LWZ Jan 16 '13 at 21:13
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4 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

pandas to the rescue:

import pandas as pd
print pd.read_csv('value.txt')

        Date    price  factor_1  factor_2
0  2012-06-11  1600.20     1.255     1.548
1  2012-06-12  1610.02     1.258     1.554
2  2012-06-13  1618.07     1.249     1.552
3  2012-06-14  1624.40     1.253     1.556
4  2012-06-15  1626.15     1.258     1.552
5  2012-06-16  1626.15     1.263     1.558
6  2012-06-17  1626.15     1.264     1.572

This returns pandas DataFrame that is similar to R's.

share|improve this answer
    
The import is probably better as import pandas as pd. Then use pd.read_csv. –  Steven Rumbalski Jan 16 '13 at 19:02
    
@StevenRumbalski -- I agree, it is just too easy for quick hacks like this (editing...) –  root Jan 16 '13 at 19:04
    
Great docs! pandas.pydata.org –  Colonel Panic Jan 16 '13 at 19:07
    
thank you root , and thank you all guys , i downloaded pandas , and it works in a perfect way . –  mazlor Jan 16 '13 at 19:13
    
@mazlor -- have fun with it. –  root Jan 16 '13 at 19:14
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You can use the csv module found in the python standard library to manipulate CSV files.

example:

import csv
with open('some.csv', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    for row in reader:
        print row
share|improve this answer
    
-0. Coming from R, mazlor wouldn't be looking for the csv module as it is too low level. pandas provides the requested level of abstraction. –  Steven Rumbalski Jan 16 '13 at 19:10
    
...in addition it does read the data into a useful Python object such as a numpy array... –  Paul Hiemstra Jan 16 '13 at 19:16
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Note quite as clean, but:

import csv

with open("value.txt", "r") as f:
    csv_reader = reader(f)
    num = '  '
    for row in csv_reader:
        print num, '\t'.join(row)
        if num == '  ':  
            num=0
        num=num+1

Not as compact, but it does the job:

   Date price   factor_1    factor_2
1 2012-06-11    1600.20 1.255   1.548
2 2012-06-12    1610.02 1.258   1.554
3 2012-06-13    1618.07 1.249   1.552
4 2012-06-14    1624.40 1.253   1.556
5 2012-06-15    1626.15 1.258   1.552
6 2012-06-16    1626.15 1.263   1.558
7 2012-06-17    1626.15 1.264   1.572
share|improve this answer
    
This does not answer the OP's question as it does not read the csv data into a Python object. –  Paul Hiemstra Jan 16 '13 at 19:15
    
maybe replace the num with enumerate in the for loop? –  LWZ Jan 16 '13 at 19:35
    
@PaulHiemstra, OP did not mention "object", but ask for ease. Still, I suspect the "pandas" approach better fits what was being asked for. –  Lee-Man Jan 16 '13 at 21:32
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Here's an alternative to pandas library using Python's built-in csv module.

import csv
from pprint import pprint
with open('foo.csv', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    headers = reader.next()
    column = {h:[] for h in headers}
    for row in reader:
        for h, v in zip(headers, row):
            column[h].append(v)
    pprint(column)    # Pretty printer

will print

{'Date': ['2012-06-11',
          '2012-06-12',
          '2012-06-13',
          '2012-06-14',
          '2012-06-15',
          '2012-06-16',
          '2012-06-17'],
 'factor_1': ['1.255', '1.258', '1.249', '1.253', '1.258', '1.263', '1.264'],
 'factor_2': ['1.548', '1.554', '1.552', '1.556', '1.552', '1.558', '1.572'],
 'price': ['1600.20',
           '1610.02',
           '1618.07',
           '1624.40',
           '1626.15',
           '1626.15',
           '1626.15']}
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