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I have a piece of code like below:

var selected = “A”;
bool isSelected = selected == "A" || selected == "C";
var codeLists = new
{
    displayProperty1 = isSelected ? "property1" : null,
    displayProperty2 = isSelected ? "property2" : null,
    displayProperty3 = selected == "C" ? "property3" : null
};

So, my goal is to eliminate a property if it does not satisfy a condition. In the above code, selected is "A". So, displayProperty3 would have a value of null. But I want to eliminate displayProperty3 so that if selected is "A", then there should be only 2 properties in the object.

If there is any proper and efficient way to do this, I would be grateful for it.

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Why do you want to remove one of the properties all together? –  Robert Jan 16 '13 at 19:10
2  
What could you meaningfully do with this object? If I pass codeLists to something and it tries to access displayProperty3, what would you propose happen? –  Ryan Cavanaugh Jan 16 '13 at 19:11
1  
I bet there's a quicker/easier/better way to achieve whatever you are trying to do –  BlackBear Jan 16 '13 at 19:12
    
Coz, i want to format my object before returning it to the UI. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:13
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, an anonymous type still follows the rules of other types, they're just not explicitly defined at compile-time. To do what you want you'd have to define two different types.

If you don't want to show that property in your UI (e.g. if you ware binding to a grid that's auto-generated and you don't want that to be a column) then deal with that in your UI.

However, if you HAVE to do this, you'd have to create two different types (either anonymous or explicit):

var selected = "A";
bool isSelected = selected == "A" || selected == "C";
dynamic codeLists;
if(selected == "C")
{
    codeLists = new
    {
        displayProperty1 = isSelected ? "property1" : null,
        displayProperty2 = isSelected ? "property2" : null
    }; 
}
else
{
    codeLists = new
    {
        displayProperty1 = isSelected ? "property1" : null,
        displayProperty2 = isSelected ? "property2" : null,
        displayProperty3 = "property3" 
    }; 
}

It would be better if you created a base type with the common properties, but either way they are going to be two different types:

public class CodeList
{
    public string displayProperty1 {get; set;}
    public string displayProperty2 {get; set;}
}

public class CodeListC : CodeList
{
    public string displayProperty3 {get; set;}
    // Other two properties will be inherited
}
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But my aim is to send only those properties that are required for a page and not all the properties that exist in the method. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:19
    
Then you'll have to use two different anonymous types, which could get messy on the UI side. How does the UI know if the property exists or not? –  D Stanley Jan 16 '13 at 19:21
    
Well, i`m having 2 common properties for 2 pages and 1 unique property for just one of the pages. If i could eliminate that property before sending the object to the UI, only those properties that are required by that page will arrive. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:27
    
Then you should have two different types. If you want to have a base type between them to reuse code that's fine. –  D Stanley Jan 16 '13 at 19:31
    
Actually, my aim was to optimize my code as much as i could. Unfortunately, i had to deal with requirements that stressed me to result in the shortening of code. I had a similar code as yours. But my seniors weren`t satisfied. So, i had to remove the If else... Anyway, thanks for your support!. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:39
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I don't think you want to remove the property. What you really want to do is have a test on the UI that doesn't display something if its null.

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Well, i wanted to format the object by removing unnecessary properties so that in my callback function, not just the data of that property, but the property itself would be non-existent. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:47
    
I guess I don't see why you care what gets sent to the page. If a property on an object is null then it is essentially non-existent like you want. Is there a specific reason you care if an object has a property at the ui level? –  Robert Jan 16 '13 at 19:56
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If I understood correctly, the object you are building should represent somehow an interface right? Now, building an interface based on the presence/absence of properties doesn't sound very appealing to me, I think it's a terrible idea actually as your code would become a nightmare.
I think you should revise your approach. Have you considered using for example a dictionary? You can still check if something is there or not plus the code needed to handle that will be much simpler (first of all, no reflection...).
Here's the equivalent piece of code of what you posted in your question:

var selected = “A”;
bool isSelected = selected == "A" || selected == "C";

var codeList = new Dictionary<string, string>();
if(isSelected) {
    codeList["displayProperty1"] = "property1";
    codeList["displayProperty2"] = "property2";
}

if(selected == "C")
    codeList["displayProperty3"] = "property3";

If !isSelected the dictionary won't contain the keys called displayProperty1 and displayProperty2.

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No. It isn`t an Interface. It`s just a method that returns certain properties to certain pages. Not all properties are returned to all the pages. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:32
    
@zapper it's not very important wether it's an interface or not. Checking if a key in a dictionary exists is much more conventional ("normal") than checking for properties. If you really need that you've chosen the wrong language –  BlackBear Jan 16 '13 at 19:34
    
Thanks for the suggestion!. –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:43
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Just because anonymous objects (and var) are not explicitly typed does not mean they don't have types. The type needs to be able to be completely defined at compile time, or your code won't build.

Since an object of a type with properties displayProperty1 and displayProperty2 is different from one of a type with those two plus displayProperty3, then you can't try to stick them both into the same variable, any more than you can put a string and an int into the same one.

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Isn`t there any way i can make the unwanted properties as undefined just before code is compiled? Any conditional operation possible? –  zapper Jan 16 '13 at 19:23
    
No. The class definition is defined at compile-time. There's no way to add/remove properties at runtime. –  D Stanley Jan 16 '13 at 19:30
    
@zapper - The best you can do is declare things dynamic, but that simply means it doesn't check for what type it is at compile time, and you're just asking for hard-to-trace errors if you use that frequently. –  Bobson Jan 16 '13 at 19:37
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You should take a look at dynamic instead of var:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd264736.aspx

Var is a way to create a new strongly typed entity at compile time. Dynamic is not strongly typed and properties can be added/removed during code execution.

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Even with dynamic there's no way to conditionally add a property to an anonymous type. –  D Stanley Jan 16 '13 at 19:28
    
You are correct, which is why I was suggesting to use dynamic instead of an anonymous type :) –  lehn0058 Jan 16 '13 at 19:37
1  
But you still have to define the type somewhere. You can't do what the OP is trying to do just by declaring it dynamic. –  D Stanley Jan 16 '13 at 19:38
    
Yes, but you can define your dynamic object at runtime. You can assign any property you want to it using ExpandoObject. This can be in a loop where you would determin based on the value of other properties which ones should be added. Not saying you should do it this way, but you can. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/… –  lehn0058 Jan 16 '13 at 19:48
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