Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am seeking advice on how to design a flexible and logical directory structure for a cross-platform library. The library is intended to be portable to several UNIX-like operating systems and a few processor architectures, with the following criterias:

  • OS-specific code;
  • CPU-specific code;
  • OS- and CPU-specific code;
  • Ability to override certain files when a specialized implementation exists;
  • Few locations to visit when porting.

I believe it'd be wise to push these issues into the hands of a capable building system, but I don't want to risk the directory structure getting complicated in the process. Worth noting is that there's going to be quite a lot of files, of which possibly a third are going to be OS- or CPU-specific, or both.

This is what I've come up with so far:

bin/
doc/
include/
    ports/
        {linux,freebsd,openbsd,...}/
            {amd64,x86,arm,...}/
                ...
    <shared code>
src/
    ports/
         {linux,freebsd,openbsd,...}/
            {amd64,x86,arm,...}/
                ...
    <shared code>

When installing this library, it'd be perfectly fine to copy around headers to allow for prettier code like: #include <bits/abi.h> which could be the header for linux-amd64.

What is an elegant approach to this potential mess?

share|improve this question
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.