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For a fixed integer n, I have a set of 2(n-1) simultaneous equations as follows.

M(p) = 1+((n-p-1)/n)*M(n-1) + (2/n)*N(p-1) + ((p-1)/n)*M(p-1)

N(p) = 1+((n-p-1)/n)*M(n-1) + (p/n)*N(p-1)

M(1) = 1+((n-2)/n)*M(n-1) + (2/n)*N(0)

N(0) = 1+((n-1)/n)*M(n-1)

M(p) is defined for 1 <= p <= n-1. N(p) is defined for 0 <= p <= n-2. Notice also that p is just a constant integer in every equation so the whole system is linear.

I have been using Maple but I would like to set these up and solve them in python now, maybe using numpy.linalg.solve (or any other better method). I actually only want the value of M(n-1). For example, when n=2 the answer should be M(1) = 4, I believe. This is because the equations become

M(1) = 1+(2/2)*N(0)
N(0) = 1 + (1/2)*M(1)

Therefore

M(1)/2 = 1+1

and so

M(1) = 4. 

If I want to plug in n=50, say, how can you set up this system of simultaneous equations in python so that numpy.linalg.solve can solve them?

Update The answers are great but they use dense solvers where the system of equations is sparse. Posted follow up to Using scipy sparse matrices to solve system of equations .

share|improve this question
    
These don't look like linear equations so I don't think you'll be able solve them with a linear algebra solver. –  David Brown Jan 16 '13 at 20:42
2  
Can you express those using *? I'm having a hard time resolving operator precendence with your implicit multiplies –  Eric Jan 16 '13 at 21:29
    
@lip1: these are not linear equations. The last term of the M(p) contains the product of p and M(p-1). This is contrary to the definition of a linear equation, which requires that each term be a constant or a first-order term. –  Dancrumb Jan 16 '13 at 21:32
1  
@lip1 is correct with his claim of linearity. p is a constant for each equation, M(p-1) simply refers to the previous element in vector M. –  s.bandara Jan 16 '13 at 21:49
    
...which is best seen if you put the constant, i.e. the 1s on one side and all the rest on the other –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 16 '13 at 21:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Updated: added implementation using scipy.sparse


This gives the solution in the order N_max,...,N_0,M_max,...,M_1.

The linear system to solve is of the shape A dot x == const 1-vector. x is the sought after solution vector.
Here I ordered the equations such that x is N_max,...,N_0,M_max,...,M_1.
Then I build up the A-coefficient matrix from 4 block matrices.

Here's a snapshot for the example case n=50 showing how you can derive the coefficient matrix and understand the block structure. The coefficient matrix A is light blue, the constant right side is orange. The sought after solution vector x is here light green and used to label the columns. The first column show from which of the above given eqs. the row (= eq.) has been derived: enter image description here

As Jaime suggested, multiplying by n improves the code. This is not reflected in the spreadsheet above but has been implemented in the code below:

Implementation using numpy:

import numpy as np
import numpy.linalg as linalg


def solve(n):
    # upper left block
    n_to_M = -2. * np.eye(n-1) 

    # lower left block
    n_to_N = (n * np.eye(n-1)) - np.diag(np.arange(n-2, 0, -1), 1)

    # upper right block
    m_to_M = n_to_N.copy()
    m_to_M[1:, 0] = -np.arange(1, n-1)

    # lower right block
    m_to_N = np.zeros((n-1, n-1))
    m_to_N[:,0] = -np.arange(1,n)

    # build A, combine all blocks
    coeff_mat = np.hstack(
                          (np.vstack((n_to_M, n_to_N)),
                           np.vstack((m_to_M, m_to_N))))

    # const vector, right side of eq.
    const = n * np.ones((2 * (n-1),1))

    return linalg.solve(coeff_mat, const)

Solution using scipy.sparse:

from scipy.sparse import spdiags, lil_matrix, vstack, hstack
from scipy.sparse.linalg import spsolve
import numpy as np


def solve(n):
    nrange = np.arange(n)
    diag = np.ones(n-1)

    # upper left block
    n_to_M = spdiags(-2. * diag, 0, n-1, n-1)

    # lower left block
    n_to_N = spdiags([n * diag, -nrange[-1:0:-1]], [0, 1], n-1, n-1)

    # upper right block
    m_to_M = lil_matrix(n_to_N)
    m_to_M[1:, 0] = -nrange[1:-1].reshape((n-2, 1))

    # lower right block
    m_to_N = lil_matrix((n-1, n-1))
    m_to_N[:, 0] = -nrange[1:].reshape((n-1, 1))

    # build A, combine all blocks
    coeff_mat = hstack(
                       (vstack((n_to_M, n_to_N)),
                        vstack((m_to_M, m_to_N))))

    # const vector, right side of eq.
    const = n * np.ones((2 * (n-1),1))

    return spsolve(coeff_mat.tocsr(), const).reshape((-1,1))

Example for n=4:

[[ 7.25      ]
 [ 7.76315789]
 [ 8.10526316]
 [ 9.47368421]   # <<< your result
 [ 9.69736842]
 [ 9.78947368]]

Example for n=10:

[[ 24.778976  ]
 [ 25.85117842]
 [ 26.65015984]
 [ 27.26010007]
 [ 27.73593401]
 [ 28.11441922]
 [ 28.42073207]
 [ 28.67249606]
 [ 28.88229939]
 [ 30.98033266]  # <<< your result
 [ 31.28067182]
 [ 31.44628982]
 [ 31.53365219]
 [ 31.57506477]
 [ 31.58936225]
 [ 31.58770694]
 [ 31.57680467]
 [ 31.560726  ]]
share|improve this answer
    
This looks very elegant! –  lip1 Jan 16 '13 at 22:56
    
@lip1, please let me know if its actually correct -- it seems to be correct for n=3, but you might be able to check also for n=10 with your Maple code... –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 16 '13 at 23:00
    
Nice! As I commented in my answer, you can clean up the code a little by multiplying by n everywhere to get rid of all the denominators. –  Jaime Jan 16 '13 at 23:56
1  
@TheodrosZelleke My system is actually sparse. Maybe docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/sparse.linalg.html is the way to go? –  lip1 Jan 17 '13 at 13:03
1  
@lip1, I added an implementation using scipy.sparse... I'm not an expert though, for sure construction of the coefficient matrix can be done faster and/or more efficient using/combining different storage schemes... or maybe building the whole matrix at once. But I guess this doesn't matter cause the bottleneck will anyway be the solver... –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 17 '13 at 15:58

This is messy, but solves your problem, barring a very probable mistake transcribing the coefficients:

from __future__ import division
import numpy as np    
n = 2
# Solution vector is [N[0], N[1], ..., N[n - 2], M[1], M[2], ..., M[n - 1]]
n_pos = lambda p : p
m_pos = lambda p : p + n - 2
A = np.zeros((2 * (n - 1), 2 * (n - 1)))
# p = 0
# N[0] + (1 - n) / n * M[n-1] = 1
A[n_pos(0), n_pos(0)] = 1 # N[0]
A[n_pos(0), m_pos(n - 1)] = (1 - n) / n #M[n - 1]
for p in xrange(1, n - 1) :
    # M[p] + (1 + p - n) /n * M[n - 1] - 2 / n * N[p - 1] +
    #  (1 - p) / n * M[p - 1] = 1
    A[m_pos(p), m_pos(p)] = 1 # M[p]
    A[m_pos(p), m_pos(n - 1)] =  (1 + p - n) / n # M[n - 1]
    A[m_pos(p), n_pos(p - 1)] = -2 / n # N[p - 1]
    if p > 1 :
        A[m_pos(p), m_pos(p - 1)] = (1 - p) / n # M[p - 1]
    # N[p] + (1 + p -n) / n * M[n - 1] - p / n * N[p - 1] = 1
    A[n_pos(p), n_pos(p)] = 1 # N[p]
    A[n_pos(p), m_pos(n - 1)] = (1 + p - n) / n # M[n - 1]
    A[n_pos(p), n_pos(p - 1)] = -p / n # N[p - 1]
if n > 2 :
    # p = n - 1
    # M[n - 1] - 2 / n * N[n - 2] + (2 - n) / n * M[n - 2] = 1
    A[m_pos(n - 1), m_pos(n - 1)] = 1 # M[n - 1]
    A[m_pos(n - 1), n_pos(n - 2)] = -2 / n # N[n - 2]
    A[m_pos(n - 1), m_pos(n - 2)] = (2 - n) / n # M[n - 2]
else :
    # p = 1 
    #M[1] - 2 / n * N[0] = 1
    A[m_pos(n - 1), m_pos(n - 1)] = 1
    A[m_pos(n - 1), n_pos(n - 2)] = -2 / n

X = np.linalg.solve(A, np.ones((2 * (n - 1),)))

But it gives a solution of

>>> X[-1]
6.5999999999999979

for M(2) when n=3, which is not what you came up with.

share|improve this answer
    
Your exact code (after adding from future import division import numpy as np) gives me 2.53846153846 (which I don't think is right either) not 6.5999999999999979 . For n = 2 I added a full worked example to the question. –  lip1 Jan 16 '13 at 22:24
    
@lip1 It now solves n = 2 properly, that's a special case that needs to be treated apart. But my result for n = 3 is different, although the A matrix computed by the program matches with what I get by hand. What equations did you solve to get M(2) = 147 / 13? –  Jaime Jan 16 '13 at 22:25
    
My mistake I think. In Maple it is > solve({m2=1+(2/3)*n1+(1/3)*m1, m1=1+(1/3)*m2+(2/3)*n0, n1=1+(1/3)*m2+(1/3)*n0, n0=1+(2/3)*m2}) which gives m2=33/5 which is what you got! In fact I get 6.6 exactly with your code which is even better. –  lip1 Jan 16 '13 at 22:33
    
@lip1 All those assignments I have done with a for loop could be vectorized, but I already got a headache from figuring out the coefficients like this! By the way, if you multiply every equation by n things look a little bit less intimidating. –  Jaime Jan 16 '13 at 22:46
    
Thanks for your answer. –  lip1 Jan 17 '13 at 14:46

Here's an entirely different approach, using sympy. It's not fast, but it allows me to copy the RHS of your equations exactly, limiting the thinking I need to do (always a plus), and gives fractional answers.

from sympy import Integer, Symbol, Eq, solve

def build_equations(n):
    ni = n
    n = Integer(n)
    Ms = {p: Symbol("M{}".format(p)) for p in range(ni)}
    Ns = {p: Symbol("N{}".format(p)) for p in range(ni-1)}
    M = lambda i: Ms[int(i)] if i >= 1 else 0
    N = lambda i: Ns[int(i)]

    M_eqs = {}
    M_eqs[1] = Eq(M(1), 1+((n-2)/n)*M(n-1) + (2/n)*N(0))
    for p in range(2, ni):
        M_eqs[p] = Eq(M(p), 1+((n-p-1)/n)*M(n-1) + (2/n)*N(p-1) + ((p-1)/n)*M(p-1))

    N_eqs = {}
    N_eqs[0] = Eq(N(0), 1+((n-1)/n)*M(n-1))
    for p in range(1, ni-1):
        N_eqs[p] = Eq(N(p), 1+((n-p-1)/n)*M(n-1) + (p/n)*N(p-1))

    return M_eqs.values() + N_eqs.values()

def solve_system(n, show=False):

    eqs = build_equations(n)
    sol = solve(eqs)

    if show:
        print 'equations:'
        for eq in sorted(eqs):
            print eq
        print 'solution:'
        for var, val in sorted(sol.items()):
            print var, val, float(val)

    return sol

which gives

>>> solve_system(2, True)
equations:
M1 == N0 + 1
N0 == M1/2 + 1
solution:
M1 4 4.0
N0 3 3.0
{M1: 4, N0: 3}
>>> solve_system(3, True)
equations:
M1 == M2/3 + 2*N0/3 + 1
M2 == M1/3 + 2*N1/3 + 1
N0 == 2*M2/3 + 1
N1 == M2/3 + N0/3 + 1
solution:
M1 34/5 6.8
M2 33/5 6.6
N0 27/5 5.4
N1 5 5.0
{M2: 33/5, M1: 34/5, N1: 5, N0: 27/5}        

and

>>> solve_system(4, True)
equations:
M1 == M3/2 + N0/2 + 1
M2 == M1/4 + M3/4 + N1/2 + 1
M3 == M2/2 + N2/2 + 1
N0 == 3*M3/4 + 1
N1 == M3/2 + N0/4 + 1
N2 == M3/4 + N1/2 + 1
solution:
M1 186/19 9.78947368421
M2 737/76 9.69736842105
M3 180/19 9.47368421053
N0 154/19 8.10526315789
N1 295/38 7.76315789474
N2 29/4 7.25
{N2: 29/4, N1: 295/38, M1: 186/19, M3: 180/19, N0: 154/19, M2: 737/76}

which seems to match the other answers.

share|improve this answer
    
That's great, thanks! –  lip1 Jan 17 '13 at 14:10
    
+1) very nice --- maybe you can 'branch out' and use the intermediate EQ-objects to construct numpy-arrays to solve (in addition) numerically –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 17 '13 at 14:26
    
The problem with the approach (as DSM implies) is that it keeps complete precision which means it simply doesn't work for n>100 or so. –  lip1 Jan 17 '13 at 14:38

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