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In Java, when I need a callback function, I have to implement an anonymous class. Inside the anonymous class, I can access the outside variables if they're final.

Now I'm doing the same thing in C++. I understand that C++ lambda works better but sometimes I need to pass in many functions where with anonymous classes, I only need to pass in one instance.

I tried the following example. It works with GCC 4.3.4.

class IA {
public:
  virtual int f(int x) = 0;  
};

int main() {
    class : public IA {
        int f(int x) { return x + 1; }
    } a;
    doFancyWork(&a);
    return 0;
}

Is it possible to capture the outside variables like this?

int main() {
    int y = 100; // mark y as final if possible
    class : public IA {
        int f(int x) { return x + y; }
    } a;
    return 0;
}

UPDATE:

The second example won't compile. The errors are here,

prog.cpp: In member function ‘virtual int main()::<anonymous class>::f(int)’:
prog.cpp:9: error: use of ‘auto’ variable from containing function
prog.cpp:7: error:   ‘int y’ declared here
prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
prog.cpp:7: warning: unused variable ‘y’

UPDATE:

I just realized a few more problems in doing this:

  • I cannot write a constructor because the class doesn't have a name
  • initializer list doesn't allow inheritance.
  • any change to make it compile makes the code unreadable.

I think I have to move away from anonymous classes.

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Does it compile and run? –  Code-Apprentice Jan 16 '13 at 21:58
    
The first example compiles. (tested with ideone.com) The second doesn't. –  woodings Jan 16 '13 at 22:00
2  
To capture the value of y, you would need to add a member y to your anonymous class. (Or a lambda automatically handles "capturing" in exactly that way.) –  aschepler Jan 16 '13 at 22:02
    
4.3.4? Why do you test your code with ancient compilers? –  PlasmaHH Jan 16 '13 at 22:02
1  
you could add a member variable _y to IA and set it to the value of y before you provide the object as a callback –  Andy Prowl Jan 16 '13 at 22:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

There is no way to automatically capture those variables, but you can use an alternative approach. This is if you want to capture by reference:

int main() {
    int y = 100; // mark y as final if possible
    class IB : public IA {
    public:
      IB(int& y) : _y(y) {}
      int f(int x) { return x + _y; }
    private:
      int& _y;
    } a (y);
    return 0;
}

If you want to capture by value, just change int& into int.

Anyway, you may consider using a tuple of lambdas as a "multi-callback" object if that is what bothers you about individual lambdas. You would still have everything packed in one object and capturing would be done for free.

Just as an example:

auto callbacks = make_tuple(
    [] (int x) { cout << x << endl; },
    [&] () { cout << y << endl; }, // y is captured by reference
    [=] (int x) { cout << x + y << endl; }, // y is captured by value
    // other lambdas here, if you want...
    );
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for tuple of lambdas. That's a very elegent solution to the problem at hand. –  Jake Woods Jan 16 '13 at 22:36
    
@JakeWoods: thank you. i do suggest using that, as you won't have to cope with manually capturing variables –  Andy Prowl Jan 16 '13 at 22:38

You can capture the variable manually (which is similar to what a lambda capture does behind the scenes):

int main() {
    int y = 100;
    struct { 
        int& y;
        int operator()(int x) { return x + y; }
    } anon = { y };
}

You can then use it like this:

#include <iostream>
...
std::cout << anon(10) << std::endl;

Prints 110 as expected. Unfortunately you can't have the anonymous type inherit from another with this method as initializer-list constructable types can't inherit from another type. If inheritance is crucial then you should use the constructor method outlined by Andy Prowl.

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this won't compile i'm afraid... needs a few changes –  Andy Prowl Jan 16 '13 at 22:13
    
this doesn't compile on gcc 4.7.1 which is the compiler used in my company. The error looks like this,error: could not convert ‘{1}’ from ‘<brace-enclosed initializer list>’ to ‘main()::<anonymous class>’ –  woodings Jan 16 '13 at 22:28
    
Updated the code to compile. Tested on MinGW with gcc 4.7.2 –  Jake Woods Jan 16 '13 at 22:30
    
"If inheritance is crucial" - If it wasn't and he was just after an anonymous function object, then there would indeed be no need to avoid a lambda. –  Christian Rau Jan 16 '13 at 23:02

A C++ lambda can capture "outside" variables. [Edit: when I first read the question, I somehow missed where he mentioned that he's aware of lambdas. For better or worse, C++ doesn't have anything else that really resembles an anonymous class].

For example:

#include <iostream>

int main(){ 

    int y = 100;
    auto lambda = [=](int x) { return x + y; };

    std::cout << lambda(2);
}

...prints 102 as its output.

Note that although it looks somewhat like a function, a C++ lambda really results in creating a class. I suppose I should add: that class isn't technically anonymous, but it has some unspecified name that's never directly visible.

Edit: I'm still a bit puzzled about the justification for not using lambdas though. Is the intent to use one class that contains many member functions? If so, it's not clear how you plan to specify which member function to invoke at which time/for which purpose. My immediate reaction is that this sounds suspiciously as if you're trying to twist the language to support a problematic design.

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1  
He seems to be perfectly aware of this, but doesn't want to use a lambda, because he wants it to encapsulate many different functions at once. While I have to disapprove his approach from the deepest of my heart and would also recommend to just use lambdas, your answer still doesn't really answer the actual question. –  Christian Rau Jan 16 '13 at 22:04
    
@ChristianRau: Oops, I missed where he mentioned being aware of lambdas. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 16 '13 at 22:05
    
@JerryCoffin I would need to pass an event handler to someone else where I could implement multiple functions such as onEvent(), onErr() and destroy(). Because there might be so many event handlers, I didn't want to define them as individual classes and give names to them each. With lambda functions, seems I have to pass them one by one or to put them in a container class in anyway. –  woodings Jan 16 '13 at 22:19
    
As to your edit, it sounds like his doFancyWork function knows what functions to call. So it doesn't just use the () operator of some templated function type, but expects an abstract interface with a bunch of methods, that his anonymous class implements. The usual Java style callbacks, in the end. Though it still remains questionable if this style should really be transferred over to a different langauge, which has its own idiomatic (and no less flexible) ways for callbacks. –  Christian Rau Jan 16 '13 at 22:20

If your IA class really has just one virtual method that you need to override (and the real complexity is other non-virtual methods) but you don't want to capture the local variables that this method needs, how about this:

int main() {
  int y = 100;
  auto f = [=](int x){return x+y;};
  typedef decltype(f) F;
  struct IB : IA {
    F _f;
    IB(F _f): _f(_f) {}
    int f(int x) { return _f(x); }
  } a(f);
  doFancyWork(&a);
  return 0;
}
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