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I have a list of domain names that I have pulled out of an httpd.conf file. These domain names are formated as:

tld.com
cname.tld.com

Very few of these domain names share a TLD.

I am trying to output a list of just the TLD for each domain name but can't seem to figure out how to manipulate the STDOUT to show just tld.com for each string given.

For example. Let's say my list has:

site1.com
site2.com
mail.site2.com
www.site3.com
site4.com

The result I need from this list would reflect:

site1.com
site2.com
site2.com
site3.com
site4.com

Any thoughts on how I can do this?

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3 Answers

I figured it out:

 awk -F"." '{print $(NF-1)"."$NF}' /path/to/listfile
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What about site5.co.uk? –  cbuckley Jan 16 '13 at 22:25
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Try this:

rev <your file> | cut -d "." -f1-2 | rev | sort -u

Explanation:

If your file consists of these lines:

foo.com
bar.foo.com

The first rev converts it to:

moc.oof
moc.oof.rab

Then its just a matter of picking the first two fields and reversing it again. However, this only works for 3 character tlds. It won't work for something like .co.uk.

Update for CCTLDs:

#!/usr/local/bin/bash

# Usage ./foo.sh <file with FQDNS>

for i in `cat $1`
do
        j=`echo $i | rev | cut -d "." -f2`;
        if [ $j == "co" ]
        then
                # CCTLDs
                echo $i | rev | cut -d "." -f1-3 | rev >> $1.tmp
        else
                # 3 character TLD
                echo $i | rev | cut -d "." -f1-2 | rev >> $1.tmp
        fi
done
cat $1.tmp | sort -u
rm $1.tmp
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Not all ccTLDs contain .co. –  duskwuff Jan 16 '13 at 22:17
    
The "proper" list: dkim-reputation.org/regdom-libs –  cbuckley Jan 16 '13 at 22:26
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When you’re trying to find patterns in text, think regular expressions.

This Wikipedia page lists the most common symbols you’ll use in regular expressions.

Now, a TLD is a series (*) of non-dots ([^.]), a dot (\.), another series of non-dots ([^.]*]), and then the end of the line ($). The regular expression for this is:

[^.]*\.[^.]*$

Which you can use like this:

$ cat foo
site1.com
site2.com
mail.site2.com
www.site3.com
site4.com
$ grep -o '[^.]*\.[^.]*$' foo
site1.com
site2.com
site2.com
site3.com
site4.com
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