Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have the following struct to define list nodes:

 struct node {
         int            data;
         struct node*   next;
};

And I have this function to get the length of a list:

int Length(struct node* head) {
   struct node* current = head;
   int count = 0;
   while (current != NULL) {
      count++;
      current = current->next;
   }
   return count;
}

Why would I want to do this: struct node* current = head; instead of just iterating over the head?

So, why would this not be ok:

int Length(struct node* head) {
   int count = 0;
   while (head != NULL) {
      count++;
      head = head->next;
   }
   return count;
}

Doesn't the head lose the scope once it gets inside the Length function, and therefore even if we do head = head->next it won't be affected outside the function?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You can. What you can't do is, for example, int Length(struct node** head) and then pass in a main Lenght(&head); –  Aurelio De Rosa Jan 16 '13 at 22:14
    
What about this: for (struct node * p = head; p; p = p->next) { ++count; } –  Kerrek SB Jan 16 '13 at 22:37
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your two codes snippets are equivalent.

However, there's a school of thought that says that you should never modify function arguments, in order to avoid potential programming errors, and to enhance readability (you're not really modifying the head). To that end, you will often see people defining as many arguments as possible as const.

share|improve this answer
    
But in the case that I don't create a local pointer, that head will be defined local by the compiler right? –  Hommer Smith Jan 16 '13 at 22:14
    
@HommerSmith: right. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 16 '13 at 22:15
    
Yes, function parameters are like local variables. –  lethal-guitar Jan 16 '13 at 22:15
    
So if I wanted to modify that head, I would have to pass it with reference as struct node** head I believe, right? –  Hommer Smith Jan 16 '13 at 22:16
    
@HommerSmith: Indeed, the rule is that you need to pass a pointer to the thing you want to modify. If you want to modify a pointer, then you need to pass a pointer to it... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 16 '13 at 22:17
show 1 more comment

A smart compiler will do that anyway. Some people do it for clarity as head to them means the head of the list and current is just the iterator, it's just for readability.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The programmers I know all intuitively assume that the value of an argument which is passed by-value (such as the address referenced by a pointer) remain unchanged throughout the function. Due to this assumption, it's easy to introduce little bugs when extending the function. Imagine I wanted to print a little bit of debug information to your Length function:

int Length(struct node* head) {
   int count = 0;
   while (head != NULL) {
      count++;
      head = head->next;
   }
   printf( "Length of list at %p is %d\n", head, count );
   return count;
}

The larger the function gets (or the more contrived the logic is, or the less attention the guy doing the modification is paying...), the easier this kind of issue can happen.

For short functions, such as Length, I personally consider it to be fine (I do it as well).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.