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The below code throws a 'MissingMemberException'

ScriptEngine engine = Python.CreateEngine();
ScriptRuntime runtime = engine.Runtime;
ScriptScope scope = runtime.CreateScope();

string code = "emp.Name==\"Bernie\"";

ScriptSource source =
  engine.CreateScriptSourceFromString(code, SourceCodeKind.Expression);

var emp = new {Name = "Bernie"};

scope.SetVariable("emp", emp);

var res = (double)source.Execute(scope);

if I declare a type called 'Employee' and give it a member 'Name', and use this instead:

var emp = new Employee {Name = "Bernie"}

It works just as expected. Does anyone know why it doesn't work on anonymous types and is there a workaround?

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Is the Employee class public or internal? –  vcsjones Jan 16 '13 at 22:41
    
Employee class is public (but it works just fine using Employee class) –  dferraro Jan 16 '13 at 22:42
1  
What happens if you change the employee class to be internal? Does it have the same behavior as the anonymous type? (Anonymous types are always internal, so I am wondering if that is the problem). –  vcsjones Jan 16 '13 at 22:43
    
I did find that if the class was not public, the issue happened there too. But I didn't include that in my question as I was trying to keep it as simple as possible. thanks –  dferraro Jan 16 '13 at 23:02
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1 Answer 1

Your problem is that anonymous types are internal. When the complier generates an anonymous type, it is approximately this:

internal class <>f__AnonymousType0`1'<'<Name>j__TPar'> //or whatever silly name the compiler uses
{
    public string Name {get;set;}
}

You can replicate the error you are getting with a concrete class by changing it to be internal:

internal class Employee
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

OK, so that's why it's happening. How do you fix it? Well, the best approach is to just use a concrete class that is public like you have already found.

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I did find that if the class was not public, the issue happened there too. But I didn't include that in my question as I was trying to keep it as simple as possible. thanks –  dferraro Jan 16 '13 at 23:05
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