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I have a problem while compiling this code on gcc 4.7.2 (Ubuntu Server 12.10)

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  long int facto = 30;
  printf("%ld\n", fact(facto, facto - 1);
}
long int fact(long int n, long int a)
{
   if (a == 1)
      return (n);
   fact(n * a, a - 1);
}

I know this can be done with a one argument function but it's not the point here.

The error I got is : conflicting type for 'fact' (line of function declaration) previous implicit declaration of fact here (line with printf)

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"previous implicit declaration" – Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '13 at 22:39

You need a forward declaration for fact before you call it from main

long int fact(long int n, long int a); // forward declaration
int main()
{
  long int facto = 30;
  printf("%ld\n", fact(facto, facto - 1);
}
long int fact(long int n, long int a) // actual function

You could just move the implementation of fact above main in this case. Note however that this approach won't scale to more complex programs with more longer functions calling into each other.

ADD Your factorial function is wrong. Here is the corrected version

long int fact(long int n)
{
   if (a == 1)
      return (n);
   return n * fact(n - 1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
!!!! So obvious ! Thank you :) Should have used clang : error message are less confusing ! – IggY Jan 16 '13 at 22:39
    
Or, just move the function long int fact(long int n, long int a) to be above int main(). No prototyping needed then. – StarPilot Jan 16 '13 at 22:41
1  
@StarPilot yes you could, but thats technically bad practice, since at a point you might not be able to put functions above each other, if a function calls another function. – user1943931 Jan 16 '13 at 22:42
    
So then you put whatever it calls above it. Eventually you get to a function that doesn't call anything else in your project. Forward declaring is convenient, but it used to be considered bad practice in the industry and "only lazy c coders" would ever use it. Several variants and flavors used to enforce the practice of defining a function (no prototyping) before it was called. It was considered good practice as the consensus of the time was that it helped enforced good design. Times change, practices change. – StarPilot Jan 16 '13 at 22:52
#include <stdio.h>
long int fact(long int n, long int a);
int main()
{
  long int facto = 30;
  printf("%ld\n", fact(facto, facto - 1);
}
long int fact(long int n, long int a)
{
   if (a == 1)
      return (n);
   fact(n * a, a - 1);
}

You need a function prototype, which is basically the first line of the function with a semicolon. This will tell the compiler that this function exists.

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