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I've got two methods with the same list and types of arguments and almost the same body but each of them calls another function to fetch list of elements. To be more precise:



    public void method1 (int a, int b) {
            //body (the same in both of methods)
            List<SomeObject> list = service.getListA(int c, int d);
            //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
        }

        public void method2 (int a, int b) {
            //body (the same in both of methods)
            List<SomeObject> list = service.getListB(int c, int d, int e);
            //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
        }

What is the best approach to the problem avoiding code duplication in that case? I thought about Strategy pattern, but there is a problem with difference in argument list.

UPDATE:



    public void method1 (int a, int b) {
            //body (the same in both of methods)
            int c = some_value;
            List<SomeObject> list = service.getListA(a, b, c);
            //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
        }

        public void method2 (int a, int b) {
            //body (the same in both of methods)
            int c = some_value;
            int d = another_value;
            List<SomeObject> list = service.getListB(a, b, c, d);
            //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
        }

So some variables are local and some are passed through arguments.

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2  
Pass you List<SomeObject> as an argument to a single function and wrap it? –  fge Jan 16 '13 at 22:57
4  
Are c, d, and e fields or are they local variables in these methods? –  Don Roby Jan 16 '13 at 23:05
1  
Can you rewrite your example so it compiles or at least uses the right syntax? –  Daniel Kaplan Jan 16 '13 at 23:19
3  
I would like to reiterate @DonRoby s question about c,d,e being locally generated (inside the method) or global/externally generated. It matters A LOT to the question –  Paul Sullivan Jan 16 '13 at 23:20

6 Answers 6

Factor them out into additional methods.

public void method1 (int a, int b) {
        MyClass myClass = method3(a, b);
        List<SomeObject> list = service.getListA(myClass.getC(), myClass.getD());
        method4(list);
}

public void method2 (int a, int b) {
        MyClass myClass = method3(a, b);
        List<SomeObject> list = service.getListB(myClass.getC(), myClass.getD(), myClass.getE());
        method4(list);
}

public MyClass {
    private final int c;
    private final int d;
    private final int e;
    ...
}

public MyClass method3(int a, int b) {
    // body
    return new MyClass(c, d, e)
}

public void method4(List<SomeObject> list) {
    // rest of body
}
share|improve this answer
5  
There will still be code duplication, invoking the two methods this way is a code duplication itself... I think the OP is after a design pattern approach. –  amit Jan 16 '13 at 23:00
    
@amit I agree, however more OO methods would require even more lines of code then the small amount of duplication above. Even using a case statement introduces the same number of lines... Of course, it depends on the use case, as an OO approach may be more extensible in the future. –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 16 '13 at 23:19
    
@dicarlo2: with that approach you need a new method for every case. With the approach in my answer, you could also put the list-selection code inside the enum and get rid of the switch statement. That means, further possibilities only have to be added in the enum, and code duplication would be eliminated completely. –  jlordo Jan 16 '13 at 23:43
    
@jlordo I don't disagree, however I think it is definitely case dependent, sometimes it would be better to just factor it out into additional methods, sometimes it would be better to use a case/enum approach, sometimes it would be better to use a more OO approach. –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 17 '13 at 0:02

One way of avoiding code duplication in your case could be to introduce an extra parameter that is used to decide which method to retrieve the list is going to be used:

public void method (int a, int b, int method) {
    //body (the same in both of methods)
    List<SomeObject> list = null;
    switch (method) {
        case 1: 
            list = service.getListA(int c, int d);
            break;
        case 2: 
            list = service.getListB(int c, int d, int e);
            break;
    }
    //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
}

instead of using int method as the additional parameter I would use an new enum type and define a default case in the switch statement.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Clean and code duplication free. Just please replace the int method to an enum, for making it even better. –  amit Jan 16 '13 at 23:02
    
@amit: see my edit, wanted to push out the code and then write my comment ;) –  jlordo Jan 16 '13 at 23:03
    
Then how about including the "method fetching" part in the enum to get rid of the switch? –  assylias Jan 16 '13 at 23:05
1  
-1 Every time you want to get a list using a different method signature you have to modify this code. You are better sending in the list as a parameter –  Paul Sullivan Jan 16 '13 at 23:05
3  
@PaulSullivan: Sending the list as a paremeter is most likely impossible, assuming the arguments c,d,e are unknown before the first common code. –  amit Jan 16 '13 at 23:07

Encapsulate the invocation of service.getListA or service.getListB in an ListSource class/interface, implement each version in concrete classes and pass a concrete instance as a third argument. This is basically the object-oriented version of the answer proposed by jlordo.

interface ListSource {
    List<SomeObject> getList(int c, int d, int e);
}

class ListSourceA implements ListSource {
    // constructor etc.
    @Override
    public getList(int c, int d, int e) {
      return service.getListB(c, d);
    }
}

class ListSourceB implements ListSource {
    // constructor etc.
    @Override
    public getList(int c, int d, int e) {
      return service.getListA(c, d, e);
    }
}

public void method (int a, int b, ListSource source) {
    //body (the same in both of methods)
    List<SomeObject> list = source.getList(int c, int d, int e);
    //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
}
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1  
Or List<SomeObject> getList(int... args); –  assylias Jan 16 '13 at 23:16
public void method (int a, int b, List<SomeObject> theList) {
    //body (the same in both of methods)
    List<SomeObject> list = theList;
    //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
}

This to me removes ALL the code duplication, means the method NEVER has to be modified each time we want to operate on a list derived using a different method signature.

I believe you could further this if the type SomeObject is not known using generics i.e. (and I am not a java programmer so you will have to read the docs)

public void method (int a, int b, List<T> theList) {
    //body (the same in both of methods)
    List<T> list = theList;
    //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
}
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4  
theList is not known beforehand... –  assylias Jan 16 '13 at 23:15
    
where has to OP stated the variables c,d,e are locally derived? @assylias –  Paul Sullivan Jan 16 '13 at 23:17
2  
@PaulSullivan It's implied by the fact that they aren't part of the argument list to the methods. –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 16 '13 at 23:21
    
Admittedly he hasn't. But that would make little sense to ask in that case. It is worth clarifying. –  assylias Jan 16 '13 at 23:21
    
@dicarlo2 Not true... could be part of the class, private, protected, static, public.... –  Paul Sullivan Jan 16 '13 at 23:22

You could also use an enum:

public void method(int a, int b, Service service) {
    // body
    List<SomeObject> list = service.getList(myClass);
    // rest
}

public enum Service {
    METHOD_1 {
        @Override
        public List<SomeObject> getList(MyClass myClass) {}
    },
    METHOD_2 {
        @Override
        public List<SomeObject> getList(MyClass myClass) {}
    };

    public abstract List<SomeObject> getList(MyClass myClass);
}

public MyClass {
    private final int c;
    private final int d;
    private final int e;
    ...
}

Essentially the same as @proskor except in a different form.

share|improve this answer
    
return type void for getList()? Also, I would get rid of MyClass and would use int... as paramter for the method. –  jlordo Jan 16 '13 at 23:45
    
@jlordo Fixed, also using an additional class shields the getList method from further changes. Say you needed to add a double later to some METHOD_5, it would require one extra field in MyClass and minimal change to the original method, rather than changing every getList. –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 17 '13 at 0:09

If the body parts depend upon one another so you can't do as @dicarlo2's answer:

private interface GetObjects {
    List<SomeObject> get();
}

public void method1(int a, int b) {
    impl(a, b, new GetObjects() { public List<SomeObject> get() {
        return service.getListA(c, d);
    }});
}

public void method2(int a, int b) {
    impl(a, b, new GetObjects() { public List<SomeObject> get() {
        return service.getListB(c, d, e);
    }});
}

private void impl(int a, int b, GetObjects getObjects) {
    //body (the same in both of methods)
    List<SomeObject> list = getObjects.get();
    //rest of the body (the same in both of methods)
}

You can use an enum in place of GetObjects if you are concerned about the new, but don't mind getting the order mixed up, missing out on outer this and don't want to open this up (although it could implement an public interface).

Better syntax coming in Java SE 8, possibly. IIRC, along the lines of:

public void method1(int a, int b) {
    impl(a, b, { -> service.getListA(c, d) });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Where do c, d, and e come from? –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 16 '13 at 23:22
    
@dicarlo2 I assumed they were fields. If they're locals, then you have choices: add more params, introduce a new (hopefully interesting) object, etc. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 16 '13 at 23:30
1  
Under that assumption it looks a bit over complicated vs. simply passing the list as an argument... –  assylias Jan 16 '13 at 23:33

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