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Why the following regex: $regex = '/\b(V|E)?\d{1,2}? ?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/i'; does not match all the input below

I did think that the this (V|E)?\d{1,2}? ? would made optional the letters, the first one or two number and the first space

INPUT

<?php

$sms = array(
    'test test test 11 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test 1 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test 111 111 test test test', // does not match
    'test test test test test test 11111111',
    'test test test 1111111 test test test',
    'test test test 111111 test test test', // does not match
    'test test test E11 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test V1 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test V111 111 test test test', // does not match
    'test test test V11111111 test test test',
    'test test test V1111111 test test test',
    'test test test E111111 test test test', // does not match
    'test test test V 11 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test V 1 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test E 111 111 test test test', // does not match
    'test test test V 11111111 test test test',
    'test test test V 1111111 test test test',
    'test test test V 111111 test test test', //does not match
    'test test test V11 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test V1 111 111 test test test',
    'test test test E111 111 test test test', //does not match
    'test test test V11111111 test test test',
    'V1111111 test test test  test test test',
    'test test test V111111 test test test', // does not match
);

$regex = '/\b(V|E)?\d{1,2}? ?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/i';
$noMatches = 0;
$index = 0;
foreach($sms as $v) {
    $match = preg_match($regex, $v, $matches);



    if($match) {
        //print_r($matches);
        //echo "$v match!\n";
        //$matches++;
    }
    else {
        echo "$index - $v does NOT match!\n";
        $noMatches++;
    }
    $index++;
}
$total = count($sms);
echo "\n\nTotal: $total\nNo Matches: $noMatches\n";

OUTPUT

$ php test-regex.php 
2 - test test test 111 111 test test test does NOT match!
5 - test test test 111111 test test test does NOT match!
8 - test test test V111 111 test test test does NOT match!
11 - test test test E111111 test test test does NOT match!
14 - test test test E 111 111 test test test does NOT match!
17 - test test test V 111111 test test test does NOT match!
20 - test test test E111 111 test test test does NOT match!
23 - test test test V111111 test test test does NOT match!


Total: 24
No Matches: 8

EDIT:

Using mario suggestion the regex is now $regex = '/\b(V|E)?\d{0,2} ?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/i';, why in some cases, this regex does not capture the letter V or E

$output = array(
    'test test test E11 111 111 test test test' => 'E11 111 111',
    'test test test V1 111 111 test test test' => 'V1 111 111',
    'test test test V111 111 test test test' => 'V111 111',
    'test test test V11111111 test test test' => 'V11111111',
    'test test test V1111111 test test test' => 'V1111111',
    'test test test E111111 test test test' => 'E111111',
    'test test test V 11 111 111 test test test' => '11 111 111', // Missing Letter
    'test test test V 1 111 111 test test test' => '1 111 111', // Missing Leter
    'test test test E 111 111 test test test' => 'E 111 111',
    'test test test V 11111111 test test test' => '11111111', // Missing Letter
    'test test test V 1111111 test test test' => '1111111', // Missing Letter
    'test test test V 111111 test test test' => 'V 111111',
    'test test test V11 111 111 test test test' => 'V11 111 111',
    'test test test V1 111 111 test test test' => 'V1 111 111',
    'test test test E111 111 test test test' => 'E111 111',
    'test test test V11111111 test test test' => 'V11111111',
    'V1111111 test test test  test test test' => 'V1111111',
    'test test test V111111 test test test' => 'V111111',
    'V 1111111 test test test' => '1111111', // Missing Letter
    'test test test V 1111111 test test test' => '1111111', // Missing Letter
);
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

? only is a quantifier after groups or literal chars or characters classes e.g.

If ? occurs after another quantifier * or + and {n,m} it will just make the matching less greedy. Meaning the regex will try to match the least amount.

So \d{1,2}? does not mean optional. It means match one or two, but prefer to match just one. You meant to write \d{0,2} instead.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks for the answer, I'm now one step closer, only one problem remains. Why in some cases the regex does not capture the letter 'V' or 'E', please see my edit. Thanks again –  Cesar Jan 17 '13 at 0:00
    
Looking at your dataset again you might alternatively try with /[VE]?(\d{1,2}| )?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/i or if you wanna go with {0,2} something more complex like /(V|E|^|(?<=\s))\d{0,2} ?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/i instead. (You need to have something non-optional first, else the empty match {0,2} will anchor unsuitably). Also use preg_grep() if filtering array lists is the goal. –  mario Jan 17 '13 at 0:16
    
Thanks mario for the response, but neither one captures the letter in all cases, but it's s start –  Cesar Jan 17 '13 at 14:53
    
Your first aswer just needed to have a optional space after the letters for it to work in all the inputs /\b(V|E)? ?\d{1,2}? ?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/ –  Cesar Jan 17 '13 at 14:56

They don't match because the regex requires at least 7 digits in total:

/\b(V|E)?\d{1,2}? ?\d{3} ?\d{3}\b/
             |        |      |
             |        |      \-------->  3 digits exactly
             |        \--------------->  3 digits exactly
             \------------------------>  1 or 2 digits (prefers 1, but will match
                                         2 if there are 8 digits in a row)

All the failing inputs are one digit short.

share|improve this answer

If you want to make the first part optional entirely, you must enclose it in parenthesis and append a ? to that. You can also use a character group for V|E

(?:[VE]\d{1,2} )?
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