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I want to know what's said in the title. E.g. how to count recursive loops and return or print the result in the end.

Here is my code, but it does not work properly:

def lenRecur(aStr):
    number = 0
    print "lenRecur number is ", number
    '''
    aStr: a string

    returns: int, the length of aStr
    '''
    if aStr == '':
        return 0
    else:
        print aStr
        number += 1
        print "else number is ", number
        return lenRecur(aStr[:-1])

OK, so when I was writing I tested again and it works, IF I USE lenRecur("word", 0) and also customize my code a bit it works. The thing is, it is not legitimately allowed. It's not legitimate, I am not allowed to do that :(

So customized code:

def lenRecur(aStr, number):
    print "lenRecur number is ", number
    '''
    aStr: a string

    returns: int, the length of aStr
    '''
    if aStr == '':
        return number
    else:
        print aStr
        number += 1
        print "else number is ", number
        return lenRecur(aStr[:-1], number)
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2  
Why isn't the second version legitimate, and why can't you use iterative loops? –  Volatility Jan 17 '13 at 0:01
    
This function seems like an inefficient mimic of len. –  cwallenpoole Jan 17 '13 at 0:20
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3 Answers

I think that a recursive version of len is far from the most efficient, but if you want to do it that way, you should use a helper function to hide that second parameter:

def lenRecur(aStr):
    '''
    aStr: a string

    returns: int, the length of aStr
    '''
    # place the doc string next to the `def`
    # the outside world has no ability to accidentally set the parameter
    def lenRecurHelper(aStr, num = 0):
        print "lenRecur number is ", number

        # empty strings are falsy, so just test for that.
        if not aStr:
            return num
        print aStr
        lenRecurHelper(aStr[:-1],num + 1)

    return lenRecurHelper(aStr)
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I seem to remember something like this in SICP... –  cwallenpoole Jan 17 '13 at 0:29
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If I understood you correctly, this should solve your problem:

def lenR(s,n=0):
    if s:
        return lenR(s[:-1],n+1)
    else:
        return n

#testing it:
lenR('this code is not pretty')  # output: 23
lenR('egg')   # output: 3
lenR('spam')  # output: 4

It's not pretty, but calculating the length of a string by recursion is not pretty either.

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I believe your intention was to use number as a static function variable. This can be achieved this way:

def lenRecur(aStr):
    if not hasattr(lenRecur, 'number'):
        lenRecur.number = 0
    print "lenRecur number is ", lenRecur.number
    '''
    aStr: a string

    returns: int, the length of aStr
    '''
    if aStr == '':
        return 0
    else:
        print aStr
        lenRecur.number += 1
        print "else number is ", lenRecur.number
        return lenRecur(aStr[:-1])

An alternative that resets the counter each time, at the expense of using two arguments:

def lenRecur(aStr, recurse=False):
    if not recurse:
        lenRecur.number = 0
    print "lenRecur number is ", lenRecur.number
    '''
    aStr: a string

    returns: int, the length of aStr
    '''
    if aStr == '':
        return 0
    else:
        print aStr
        lenRecur.number += 1
        print "else number is ", lenRecur.number
        return lenRecur(aStr[:-1], True)

I do not know what the actual point of the exercise is, and what you can and cannot do in the implementation.

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It's good, but not good enough. You see, if I continue using the function the lenRecur.number goes up and up and gives incorrect answers every next time so I can't use it =( –  5brickbomzh Jan 17 '13 at 0:23
    
Yup, it sure does. You can solve it the easy way, using an extra parameter to keep the function from resetting the counter while it recourses, or the hard way, using the inspect module to check the caller and reset the counter if it's not ourselves. –  Martín Valdés de León Jan 17 '13 at 0:28
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