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I have a list of items (think, files in a directory), where the order of these items is arbitrarily managed by a user. The user can insert an item between other items, delete items, and move them around.

What is the best way to store the ordering as a property of each item so that when a specific item is inserted or moved, the ordering property of the other items is not affected? These objects will be stored in a database.

An ideal implementation would be able to support inifinite number of insertions/reorders.

The test I'm using to identify the limitations of the approach are as follows:

With 3 items x,y,z, repeatedly take the item on the left and put it between the other two; then take the object on the right and put it between the other two; keep going until some constraint is violated.

For others' reference, I have included some algorithms I have tried.

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The requirement to not impact the ordering property of other items seems overly restrictive. Is this a hard requirement? –  gilly3 Jan 17 '13 at 0:52
    
No, it's just desirable. Obviously, I can set the order for all the items at the same time, but if I do it for each item, that has a lot of overhead, and if I store the order independently, they states may get out of sync. I'm exploring various options. –  ykaganovich Jan 17 '13 at 0:55

5 Answers 5

1.1. Decimals, double-precision

Store the order as a decimal. To insert an between two items with orders x and y, calculate its order as x/2+y/2.

Limitations:

Precision, or performance. Using doubles, when the denominator becomes too big, we end up with x/2+y/2==x . In Javascript, it can only handle 25 shuffles.

function doubles(x,y,z) {
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
    //x,y,z
    //x->v1: y,v1,z
    //z->v2: y,v2,v1
      var v1 = y/2 + z/2
      var v2 = y/2 + v1/2
      x = y
      y = v2
      z = v1

      if (x == y) {
        console.log(i)
        break
      }
    }
}

>doubles(1, 1.5, 2)
>25

1.2. Decimals, BigDecimal

The same as above, but using BigDecimal from https://github.com/iriscouch/bigdecimal.js. In my test, the performance degraded unusably quickly. It might be a good choice for other frameworks, but not for client-side javascript.

I threw that implementation away and don't have it anymore.

2.1. Fractions

Store the order as a (numerator, denominator) integer tuple. To insert an item between items xN/xD and yN/yD, give it a value of (xN+yN)/(xD+yD) (which can easily be shown to be between the other two numbers).

Limitations:

precision or overflow.

function fractions(xN, xD, yN, yD, zN, zD){
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
    //x,y,z
    //x->v1: y,v1,z
    //z->v2: y,v2,v1

      var v1N = yN + zN, v1D = yD + zD
      var v2N = yN + v1N, v2D = yD + v1D

      xN = yN, xD=yD

      yN = v2N, yD=v2D

      zN = v1N, zd=v1D

      if (!isFinite(xN) || !isFinite(xD)) { // overflow
        console.log(i)
        break
      }
      if (xN/xD == yN/yD) { //precision
        console.log(i)
        break
      }
    }
}

>fractions(1,1,3,2,2,1)
>737

2.2. Fractions with GCD reduction

The same as above, but reduce fractions using a Greatest Common Denomenator algorithm:

function gcd(x, y) {
    if(!isFinite(x) || !isFinite(y)) {
        return NaN
    }
    while (y != 0) {
        var z = x % y;
        x = y;
        y = z;
    }
    return x;
}

function fractionsGCD(xN, xD, yN, yD, zN, zD) {
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
    //x,y,z
    //x->v1: y,v1,z
    //z->v2: y,v2,v1

      var v1N = yN + zN, v1D = yD + zD
      var v2N = yN + v1N, v2D = yD + v1D

      var v1gcd=gcd(v1N, v1D)
      var v2gcd=gcd(v2N, v2D)

      xN = yN, xD = yD
      yN = v2N/v2gcd, yD=v2D/v2gcd
      zN = v1N/v1gcd, zd=v1D/v1gcd

      if (!isFinite(xN) || !isFinite(xD)) { // overflow
        console.log(i)
        break
      }
      if (xN/xD == yN/yD) { //precision
        console.log(i)
        break
      }
    }
}

>fractionsGCD(1,1,3,2,2,1)
>6795

3. Alphabetic

Use alphabetic ordering. The idea is to start with an alphabet (say, ascii printable range of [32..126]), and grow the strings. So, ('O' being the middle of our range), to insert between "a" and "c", use "b", to insert between "a" and "b", use "aO", and so forth.

Limitations:

The strings would get so long as to not fit in a database.

function middle(low, high) {
    for(var i = 0; i < high.length; i++) {
        if (i == low.length) {
            //aa vs aaf
            lowcode=32
            hicode = high.charCodeAt(i)

            return low +  String.fromCharCode( (hicode - lowcode) / 2)
        }

        lowcode = low.charCodeAt(i)
        hicode = high.charCodeAt(i)

        if(lowcode==hicode) {
            continue
        }
        else if(hicode - lowcode == 1) {
            // aa vs ab
            return low + 'O';
        } else {
            // aa vs aq
            return low.slice(0,i) + String.fromCharCode(lowcode + (hicode - lowcode) / 2)
        }
    }
}

function alpha(x,y,z, N) {
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
    //x,y,z
    //x->v1: y,v1,z
    //z->v2: y,v2,v1
        var v1 = middle(y, z)
        var v2 = middle(y, v1)
        x = y
        y = v2
        z = v1

        if(x.length > N) {
            console.log(i)
            break
        }
    }
}

>alpha('?', 'O', '_', 256)
1023
>alpha('?', 'O', '_', 512)
2047
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The problem you are trying to solve is potentially insertion sort which has a simple implementation of O(n^2). But there are ways to improve it. Suppose there is an order variable associated to each element. You can assign these orders smartly with large gaps between variables and get an amortized O(n*log(n)) mechanism. Look at (Insertion sort is nlogn)

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Software axiom #1: KEEP IT SIMPLE until you have found a compelling, real and proven reason to make it more complicated.

So, I'd argue that it's extra and unnecessary code and maintenance to maintain your own order property when the DOM is already doing it for you. Why not just let the DOM maintain the order and you can dynamically generate a set of brain-dead simple sequence numbers for the current ordering any time you need it? CPUs are plenty fast to generate new sequence numbers for all items anytime you need it or anytime it changes. And, if you want to save this new ordering on the server, just send the whole sequence to the server.

Implementing one of these splitting sequences so you can always insert more objects without ever renumbering anything is going to be a lot of code and a lot of opportunities for bugs. You should not go there until it's been proven that you really need that level of complication.

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Store the items in an array, and use splice() to insert and delete elements.

Or is this not acceptable because of the comment you made in response to the linked list answer?

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Perhaps I have missed something fundamental and I will admit I know little enough about javascript, but surely you can just implement a doubly-linked list to deal with this? Then re-ordering a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h to insert X between d and e you just unlink d->e, link d->X and then link X->e and so on.

Because in any of the scenarios above, either you will run out of precision (and your infinite ordering is lost) or you'll end up with very long sort identifiers and no memory :)

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Yes, I forgot to mention linked lists, but that's definitely another option to explore. The issue with it is that it doesn't very well handle deleted items. I haven't mentioned this, but in my case items may get deleted by other means than in-app user actions, and in that case the links will be broken. –  ykaganovich Jan 17 '13 at 0:57
    
How does an item get deleted without notifying the app? What's the container that it's being deleted from, if not part of the app? –  Barmar Jan 17 '13 at 1:04
    
The DOM already is a doubly linked list (with firstChild and parent too). Why reimplement a doubly linked list when you can just use the DOM order that is already there for you? –  jfriend00 Jan 17 '13 at 1:07
    
I agree with Barmar; can you give more context on how items can get deleted from this list without user interaction and why you wouldn't be able to know about it? –  Stephen Byrne Jan 17 '13 at 1:19
    
These are not just DOM objects. These are representations of records stored in the DB on the backend. Assume user1 and user2 both have access to a directory, and user2 decides to delete a file in it. User1-specific representation of the file order needs to be able to handle this. –  ykaganovich Jan 17 '13 at 5:41

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