Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If a C# derived IDisposable class constructor generates an error, how to dispose of the already fully constructed IDisposable base class?

Since all fields in the class hierarchy are initialized before any constructor executes, is it safe for the derived constructor to call base.Dispose()? It violates the rule of not calling virtual methods until object is fully constructed, but I can't think of another way to do it, and my searching hasn't turned up anything about this scenario.

share|improve this question
    
If it can be helped constructor should not throw an exception. Have an init method instead. –  zespri Jan 17 '13 at 1:41
    
Constructors should not call virtual methods which are not required to be capable of handling partially-constructed objects. Properly-written dispose methods for inheritable classes must generally be capable of handling partially-constructed objects, since that's the most practical way to prevent leaks. –  supercat Jan 18 '13 at 3:01
    
@supercat: I didn't realize the virtual function table was in place before all the constructors ran. Assuming the Dispose methods are written to handle partially constructed objects (mine are), you'd want to mark the derived class sealed so that someone doesn't inherit from that class and define a virtual dispose method in their class which did not handle partially constructed objects. –  jimvfr Jan 19 '13 at 0:16
    
@jimvfr: Unless the derived class has reason to be more paranoid about child classes than its base, why should it assume that even though it could follow the base contract, sub-derived classes wouldn't be able to? I would posit that a decision to seal or not seal classes should be made primarily on other bases. –  supercat Jan 20 '13 at 14:07

4 Answers 4

This solution builds on the proposal by @supercat. Initialization of any member that might throw must be performed in the constructor's try/catch block. With that condition met an exception thrown from any constructor will correctly dispose a fully or partially constructed base or derived class.

In this test code uncomment each of the four exceptions in turn and the program will output which of the Disposable resources were not disposed properly due to the constructor throwing an exception. Then uncomment the two Dispose calls and observe that everything gets cleaned up as it should.

    class DisposableResource : IDisposable
    {
        public DisposableResource(string id) { Id = id; }
        ~DisposableResource() { Console.WriteLine(Id + " wasn't disposed.\n"); }
        public string Id { get; private set; }
        public void Dispose() { GC.SuppressFinalize(this); }
    }

    class Base : IDisposable
    {
        public Base()
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception();      // Exception 1.
                _baseCtorInit = new DisposableResource("_baseCtorInit");
//              throw new Exception();      // Exception 2.
            }
            catch(Exception)
            {
//              Dispose();                  // Uncomment to perform cleanup.
                throw;
            }
        }

        public virtual void Dispose()
        {
            if (_baseFieldInit != null)
            {
                _baseFieldInit.Dispose();
                _baseFieldInit = null;
            }

            if (_baseCtorInit != null)
            {
                _baseCtorInit.Dispose();
                _baseCtorInit = null;
            }
        }

        private DisposableResource _baseFieldInit = new DisposableResource("_baseFieldInit");
        private DisposableResource _baseCtorInit;
    }

    class Derived : Base
    {
        public Derived()
        {
            try
            {
//              throw new Exception();      // Exception 3.
                _derivedCtorInit = new DisposableResource("_derivedCtorInit");
//              throw new Exception();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
//              Dispose();                  // Uncomment to perform cleanup.
                throw;
            }
        }

        public override void Dispose()
        {
            if (_derivedFieldInit != null)
            {
                _derivedFieldInit.Dispose();
                _derivedFieldInit = null;
            }

            if (_derivedCtorInit != null)
            {
                _derivedCtorInit.Dispose();
                _derivedCtorInit = null;
            }

            base.Dispose();
        }

        private DisposableResource _derivedFieldInit = new DisposableResource("_derivedFieldInit");
        private DisposableResource _derivedCtorInit;
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                Derived d = new Derived();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Caught Exception.\n");
            }

            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
            GC.Collect();
            Console.WriteLine("\n\nPress any key to continue...\n");
            Console.ReadKey(false);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I would suggest that you could eliminate some redundant code if you define a method void DisposeAndClear<T>(ref T it) where T:class {T oldValue = Interlocked.Exchange(ref it, null); if (oldValue) oldValue.Dispose(); }. Then you can simple DisposeAndClear each field regardless of whether or not it's already null; further, even if Dispose somehow got called on multiple threads, each field would still only get disposed once. –  supercat Aug 21 '13 at 16:01
    
That's a good idea, but I haven't added multi-threading support to my sample in order to keep demonstration of the key principle as simple as possible. –  Neutrino Aug 22 '13 at 8:35
    
My key point wasn't the Interlocked.Exchange, but rather the fact that the per-field vertical space would be reduced from 6 lines (e.g. if (_baseFieldInit)...) to one (e.g. DisposeAndClear(ref _baseFieldInit);). Even with only two fields, I think the DisposeAndClear method would improve clarity since each field would be mentioned once rather than three times. With every additional field, one would save another five lines of vertical space. If a class has six fields, a disposal method whose body fits in six lines would IMHO be much more readable than one which takes 35. –  supercat Aug 22 '13 at 15:40

All derived class constructors must call Dispose on the object being constructed if they exit via an exception. Further, it's very difficult to write leak-proof classes if field initializers construct IDisposable instances or can fail. Too bad, since requiring objects to be declared in one place, initialized in a second, and cleaned up in a third is not exactly a recipe for coherent code.

I would suggest that the best pattern is probably something like:

class foo : baseFoo , IDisposable
{
    foo () : baseFoo
    {
        bool ok = false;
        try
        {
            do_stuff();
            ok = true; // Only after last thing that can cause failure
        }
        finally
        {
            if (!ok)
              Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Note that C++/CLI automatically implements that pattern, and can also automatically handle cleanup of IDisposable fields. Too bad the language seems like a pain in other ways.

PS--With relatively few exceptions, mostly revolving around predictable-cost shared immutable objects (e.g. brushes, fonts, small bitmaps, etc.), code which relies upon Finalize to clean up objects is broken. If an IDisposable is created, it must be disposed unless the code which created it has particular knowledge about the consequences of deferring disposal to a finalizer.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it a rule to not call virtual methods (Dispose() calls virtual method Dispose(bool) ) from a constructor? –  jimvfr Jan 18 '13 at 18:22
    
@jimvfr: One should not call virtual methods unless those methods are prepared for the possibility of being invoked on a partially-built object. It is in general easier and more reliable to require as part of a base-class contract that all subclasses must have their Dispose code be usable on partially-built objects (e.g. use a static SafeDispose method which calls Dispose on its target if non-null) and call Dispose on all construction failures, than to try to write code by hand which only examines and Disposes the IDisposable fields that have been set so far. –  supercat Jan 18 '13 at 18:30
    
@jimvfr: This does to some extent presuppose that all the things that need cleanup implement IDisposable in such a way that calling Dispose more than once would be harmless, but Microsoft's documentation suggests that IDisposable objects are supposed to behave that way. It doesn't go quite so far as to say that objects that do bad things when Dispose is called twice are "broken", but I see little reason in a GC system not to make all objects safe in the face of multiple Dispose calls. –  supercat Jan 18 '13 at 18:35
    
It's not ideal to have to take such manual control of the object construction process but I don't see any better way of handling the situation than this answer. Assuming that any fields that might throw on initialization would be assigned in the 'try' block in the constructor then what's the problem with Disposing fields initialized by field initializers? Rather than checking a bool flag I'd instead execute constructor code in a 'try/catch all' block where the catch just calls Dispose and rethrows, as that's less code and marginally more efficient. –  Neutrino Aug 20 '13 at 10:18
    
@Neutrino: One difficulty is that exceptions may occur in the base-class or derived-class constructor. If a derived class initializes any IDisposable fields using field-initializer syntax, the only way provide for timely cleanup if the base constructor throws will be to have the base constructor call Dispose. I don't think there's any reason a language couldn't allow a class to wrap the whole construction process in a try/catch block and call a user-specified method if it throws, but neither C# nor VB.NET does so. BTW, I wish there were an access specifier for individual constructors... –  supercat Aug 20 '13 at 15:03

For Managed resources, this should not be a problem, they will get Garbage Collected. For Unmanaged resources, make sure you have a Finalizer defined for your object, that will ensure the Unmanaged resources are cleaned up.

Also, throwing exceptions from a constructor is considered very bad manners, It's better to provide a Factory Method to do the construction and error handling or to equip your object with an Initialize method that will throw the actual exception. That way the construction always succeeds and you're not left with these type of issues.


Correct, Dispose isn't called by the Garbage Collector, but a Finalizer is, which in turn needs to call Dispose. It's a more expensive technique, except when used correctly. I didn't say so in my answer, did I ;).

You can call into the GC to force a collection run and you can wait for all pending finalizers. It's still better to not put the exception generating code in the construstor or by placing a try/catch around the code in the constructor to ensure Dispose is called on these files in case of an error. You can always rethrow the exception later.

share|improve this answer
    
(See my response to Frank Schwieterman) I'll use factory method –  jimvfr Jan 17 '13 at 4:30
    
In my case the base class uses a few FileStreams which are a managed resource, but need to be disposed of immediately upon error, I can't wait for the files to close later. Also the GC doesn't call Dispose. –  jimvfr Jan 17 '13 at 4:37
    
A finalizer is supposed to only clean up unmanaged resources (i.e. have your finalizer method call Dispose(false)), so I don't see how a finalizer can clean up a managed resource. –  jimvfr Jan 17 '13 at 23:00
    
In this case (which I would consider a bug in the design) you can make it call Dispose(true) to unlock the files. Though it's better to just make sure the exception never happens in the constructor (or the files aren't opened in the constructor). –  jessehouwing Jan 17 '13 at 23:03
    
Agreed it's much better to make sure constructor can't throw, that's why I'm switching to factory method as I mentioned in first comment. Factory method will then call Initialize(). –  jimvfr Jan 17 '13 at 23:18

My view is that constructors should be light, not relying on external resources/etc that might throw an exception. The constructor should do enough to verify Dispose() can be safely called. Consider using containment instead of inheritance, or having a factory method do the work that might throw.

share|improve this answer
    
Containment doesn't provide substitutability, and factory methods don't really help with inheritance. Even if a class doesn't have any public constructors and requires all instances of that type to be produced via factory method, the only way for any derived-type instances to be produced is via chained constructor, and there's no nice way to have a derived class constructor only be invokable via factory code in the base. There are some ways, but they're icky. –  supercat Jan 18 '13 at 3:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.