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I'm trying to concatenate a string from certain inputs in a form, and populate another input with that string. I've included my script below, and linked to a js fiddle.

I think the code inside the conditionals in the each() is too redundant, but I can't seem to make it work any other way. Any suggestions are appreciated.

var $namers = $(".namer");
$namers.on('change', function () {
    var length = $namers.length - 1;
    var nameString = "";
    $namers.each(function (i) {
        var delimiter = "";
        if ($(this).find(":selected").attr('value')) {
            if (i < length) delimiter = ": ";
            thisVal = $(this).find(":selected").text();
            nameString = nameString + thisVal + delimiter;
        } else if ($(this).is("input") && $(this).val()) {
            if (i < length && $(this).hasClass("from")) delimiter = "-";
            thisVal = $(this).val();
            nameString = nameString + thisVal + delimiter;
        }
    });
    $("#summary").val(nameString);
});

Here is my original: http://jsfiddle.net/3HsQW/

And a first stab at improving things using an array, which I'm not sure is much better. http://jsfiddle.net/3HsQW/1/

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closed as too localized by Dr.Molle, mVChr, Matt Whipple, Jan Hančič, Sébastien Le Callonnec Jan 17 '13 at 9:19

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1  
I do not see any redundancy, except for the nameString line. I do however find useless code: the nameString variable belongs to the anonymous function created on line 2. Each run of the anonymous functions used on the .each() call is tested, and in case it passes any of the conditions, nameString gets set. Only the last one of this assignments will be loaded into $('#sumary'). If this is the intended behaivour, you should transverse the $namers the other way around and break after finding the first hit. –  Martín Valdés de León Jan 17 '13 at 1:41
1  
Questions like this belong on codereview.stackexchange.com, not here. –  jfriend00 Jan 17 '13 at 1:47
    
@jfriend00 Thanks. I didn't know about that site. I'll see if I can close the question. –  Christopher Meyers Jan 17 '13 at 1:57
    
@MartínValdésdeLeón That is correct, I think. I'm not clear what part of the code you are saying is useless. Also, what is the advantage of transversing $namers in reverse? Is it to remove the i<length conditional? –  Christopher Meyers Jan 17 '13 at 2:47
    
A more relevant issue may be how little the code says about what its intent is:ambiguous logic/weak model. If you're worried about performance you should assign $(this) to not continually call jQuery. Any reason not to use the labels to also be the values in the select? The biggest performance gain would be to remove the loop entirely (& repeated DOM inspection) & only react to the single control that has changed-using something like a stripped down bound model:create an in-memory structure and only update the piece that is relevant which can then be manipulated to produce the summary. –  Matt Whipple Jan 17 '13 at 3:55
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3 Answers

I haven't tested it fully, but something like this should work as well:

var $namers = $('.namer');

$namers.on('change', function () {
    var nameString = '';

    $namers.each(function(i) {
        var $this = $(this);
        var $selected = $this.find(':selected');

        if ($selected.attr('value')) {
            nameString += $selected.val() + ': ';
        } else if ($this.is('input') && $this.val()) {
            nameString += $this.val() + $this.hasClass('from') ? '-' : '';
        }
    });

    $('#summary').val(nameString);
});

The i < length condition will always be false, so you can remove that code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, I'll try that out. But I am wondering about your comment regarding i < length. As far as I can tell, it actually works as intended and evaluates to true except on the last item. –  Christopher Meyers Jan 17 '13 at 1:56
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This is one of the rare cases where jquery gets in the way. I recommend something like:

$("option").each( function() { this.value = $(this).text(); } );
$namers = $(".namer");
$names.on('change', function () {
    var length = $namers.length - 1;
    var nameString = "";
    $namers.each(function (i) {
        nameString += this.value;
        if (this.tagName == 'SELECT') nameString += ':';
        if (this.className == 'from') nameString += '-';
    });
    $("#summary").val(nameString);
});
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I tried both of the other answers, and neither worked. I also learned I should be using http://codereview.stackexchange.com.

I ultimately decided on this (though I have reservations about whether this will help anyone else):

var $namers = $(".namer");
$namers.on('change', function () {
    var length = $namers.length - 1;
    var nameString = "";
    var names = [];
    $namers.each(function (i) {
        var delimiter = "";
        if (i < length) delimiter = ": ";
        if ($(this).find(":selected").attr('value')) {
            names[i] = $(this).find(":selected").text() + delimiter;
        } else if ($(this).is("input") && $(this).val()) {
            if ($(this).hasClass("from")) delimiter = "-";
            names[i] = $(this).val() + delimiter;
        }
        if (names[i]) nameString += names[i];
    });
    $("#summary").val(nameString);
});
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