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I understand that array's value can be accessed directly by their position and linked list have to go through them one by one but have no idea of how to explain the difference in terms of their overhead and storage when the search is happening.

( I am think more in terms of does the previous node need to temporary store somewhere while try to access the next node any additional storage or overhead on the system part when go through them? and same when search through an array)

Can anyone give me a detail of what happen when search in each structure? or simply point to a right direction

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To be clear, by "search" do you mean accessing each element in sequence? –  Potatoswatter Jan 17 '13 at 1:47
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Your basic algorithms book or basic algorithms course explains this. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 17 '13 at 1:49
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@LightnessRacesinOrbit The web allows faster random access ;) –  Potatoswatter Jan 17 '13 at 1:50
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Read codeproject.com/Articles/24684/… then. Millions of Google results for "C++ linked list" –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 17 '13 at 1:51
    
@Potatoswatter well, I kind want to know what happen to system when search through a linked list or array. does it store the previous value somewhere temporary when checking the next one? that's why I ask is there any overhead or storage. –  user1655072 Jan 17 '13 at 2:02

2 Answers 2

An array is a vectorial variable of a fixed size.

A Linked List has no specified size: each element of the list contains a pointer to the next element. That's why you need to iterate through it sequentially. The advantage here, is that the structure shall not be allocated in a sequential block of memory, and doesn't need to resize if you add more elements in it.

Also in an array, if you remove an element, you need to shift all previous elements. If you insert an element in the middle of an array, you need to shift elements to make space for the new one. In lists you just update the pointers:

enter image description here

On the other side, array can be accessed randomly and don't need sequential access: so they are faster to search for objects, to sort, etc.

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You make diagrams quickly! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 17 '13 at 1:50
    
wikipedia helps: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_list –  Luigi R. Viggiano Jan 17 '13 at 1:51
    
And it's a public domain image... good :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 17 '13 at 1:52
    
@LuigiR.Viggiano Is it that simple when search through a linked list? I am think more in terms of does the previous node need to temporary store somewhere while try to access the next node any additional storage or overhead on the system part when go through them? and same when search through an array –  user1655072 Jan 17 '13 at 1:55
    
In Object Oriented languages you usually have objects implementing this logic. If you need to do in plain C, it is not difficult too, but learning what are pointers and how they work may be harder if you are new to those things. Think to a linked list as a chain: every ring is linked to the next. It's not a difficult structure to implement, it's not difficult to handle. The search in a linked list is always sequential, so every element can have a link to the next element and additionally - if you want - to the previous (double-linked lists), so you can also iterate back. –  Luigi R. Viggiano Jan 17 '13 at 2:01

Having random access to a list element allows you to implement search algorithms such as a binary search, which would be impractical using a linked list.

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