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#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <windows.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string FilePath = "C:\\Documents and Settings\\whatever";
    CreateDirectory(FilePath, NULL);
return 0;
}

Error: error C2664: 'CreateDirectory' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'const char *' to 'LPCTSTR'

  1. How do I make this conversion?
  2. The next step is to set today's date as a string or char and concatenate it with the filepath. Will this change how I do step 1?
  3. I am terrible at data types and conversions, is there a good explanation for 5 year olds out there?
share|improve this question
    
I'd hate to break this to ya but C++ wasn't geared toward 5-year-olds. :( –  Mehrdad Jan 17 '13 at 1:58
    
And neither was API programming. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 17 '13 at 2:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

std::string is a class that holds char-based data. To pass a std::string data to API functions, you have to use its c_str() method to get a char* pointer to the string's actual data.

CreateDirectory() takes a TCHAR* as input. If UNICODE is defined, TCHAR maps to wchar_t, otherwise it maps to char instead. If you need to stick with std::string but do not want to make your code UNICODE-aware, then use CreateDirectoryA() instead, eg:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <windows.h>

int main()
{
    std::string FilePath = "C:\\Documents and Settings\\whatever";
    CreateDirectoryA(FilePath.c_str(), NULL);
    return 0;
}

To make this code TCHAR-aware, you can do this instead:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <windows.h>

int main()
{
    std::basic_string<TCHAR> FilePath = TEXT("C:\\Documents and Settings\\whatever");
    CreateDirectory(FilePath.c_str(), NULL);
    return 0;
}

However, Ansi-based OS versions are long dead, everything is Unicode nowadays. TCHAR should not be used in new code anymore:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <windows.h>

int main()
{
    std::wstring FilePath = L"C:\\Documents and Settings\\whatever";
    CreateDirectoryW(FilePath.c_str(), NULL);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your last example works. This leads to more questions. What is a wstring? What does the 'L' do? Is CreateDirectoryW() another available method or a modification of an existing method? –  ProGirlXOXO Jan 17 '13 at 2:13
2  
std::string holds a char-based string. std::wstring holds a wchar_t-based string. Both are specializations of std::basic_string. L tells the compiler to store the literal in wide (wchar_t) format instead of narrow (char) format. Get yourself a good C++ book, it covers these things. As for CreateDirectory(), it is actually a precompiler macro that maps to CreateDirectoryW() if UNICODE is defined, otherwise it maps to CreateDirectoryA() instead. See the declaration in winbase.h. Most Win32 API functions that deal with string data have A/W versions available. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 17 '13 at 2:35

If you're not building a Unicode executable, calling c_str() on the std::string will result in a const char* (aka non-Unicode LPCTSTR) that you can pass into CreateDirectory().

The code would look like this:

CreateDirectory(FilePath.c_str(), NULL):

Please note that this will result in a compile error if you're trying to build a Unicode executable.

If you have to append to FilePath I would recommend that you either continue to use std::string or use Microsoft's CString to do the string manipulation as that's less painful that doing it the C way and juggling raw char*. Personally I would use std::string unless you are already in an MFC application that uses CString.

share|improve this answer
    
This gives me the same error as before as well as: Types pointed to are unrelated; conversion requires reinterpret_cast, C-style cast or function-style cast –  ProGirlXOXO Jan 17 '13 at 2:08
    
That means you are compiling for Unicode, which means CreateDirectory() is mapping to CreateDirectoryW(), which takes a wchar_t* as input. You cannot pass std::string data to CreateDirectoryW(), they are not compatible. You have to either use std::wstring instead, convert the std::string data to wchar_t* using MultiByteToWideChar(), or use CreateDirectoryA() instead. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 17 '13 at 2:38

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