Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have some code that writes the system time to a file:

std::ofstream file("time.txt");

    char *date;
    time_t timer;
    timer=time(NULL);
    date = asctime(localtime(&timer));

while ( true ) {
      std::cout << date << ", " << randomNumber  << std::endl;

      if (file.is_open())
      {
        file << date;
        file << ", ";
        file << randomNumber;
        file << "\n";
      }
}

file.close()

When I let my program run and stop it in-between (its an infinite while loop), I am able to get data written to my file.

However, if I merely change the code to add a Sleep() timer. No data is written to my file. But I do see an output on the screen. Is this expected behavior? How do I ensure that even if I end my program execution mid-way, values are written to the file?

    std::ofstream file("time.txt");

        char *date;
        time_t timer;
        timer=time(NULL);
        date = asctime(localtime(&timer));

    while ( true ) {

        **Sleep(100); // wait for 100 milli-seconds**
          std::cout << date << ", " << randomNumber  << std::endl;

          if (file.is_open())
          {
            file << date;
            file << ", ";
            file << randomNumber;
            file << "\n";
          }
    }

    file.close()

If I close my file right after the sleep timer, it writes the data out. But the main reason I'm adding the timer, is that I want to slow-down how often my file is being written to ...

share|improve this question
2  
Which sleep function do you think you are calling? The sleep function in POSIX C takes it's argument in seconds, not milliseconds. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 17 '13 at 3:00
    
also is asctime a callback or interrupt or something because otherwise the same date will always be written ? –  Ben Jan 17 '13 at 3:01
    
Richard, I am on a Windows platform, so Sleep() takes in arguments in milli-seconds. I'm using Sleep() as upper-case : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…. It is seconds for Unix, I believe. Ben, the program outputs the data and time. The time constantly changes, as confirmed by my std::cout. All, I'm confused about is why it doesn't write to my file anymore ... –  c0d3rz Jan 17 '13 at 3:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to flush the buffer so the contents are written to the file. Call std::flush or change file << "\n"; to file << std::endl; to flush the stream. When you don't call Sleep in your program, the contents of the buffer are written as soon as the buffer becomes full, however, with Sleep the buffer doesn't become full right away because there is a delay, so you don't see the contents written to the file.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, HOW did you know that ? Thanks a tonne! I'd be spending hours trying to figure that out if it wasn't for your reply ... –  c0d3rz Jan 17 '13 at 3:18
1  
@c0d3rz: I've read quite a bit about iostreams. Here is a nice article about the stream buffers if you want to get more indepth. –  Jesse Good Jan 17 '13 at 3:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.