Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a Python (3.3, if it makes a difference) class that will communicate with a modem over a telnet connection. Basically, different commands will be sent to the modem depending on user input, and I'd like to keep the telnet connection open during the execution of the program. It's probably worth noting that it's my first time working with Python, having come from a C# and Java background, so I'm still trying to get the hang of it.

Anyways, I guess I haven't learned that much about OO concepts, so I was going to ask this: is there a preferred way to re-use a persistent telnet connection in multiple methods in the same class? Also, would it be advisable to put the code current in _login in __init__? I'll give some code examples:

Option A: pass tn to _login

class Communicator:
    tn = telnetlib.Telnet()

    def __init__(self, host, port, user, password):
        self._login(user, password)

    def _login(self, host, port, user, password, conn=tn):
        conn.open(host, port)
        conn.read_until("Username: ")
        conn.write(user.encode('ascii') + b"\r\n")
        conn.read_until("Password: ")
        conn.write(password.encode('ascii') + b"\r\n")

Option B: have _login use self.tn

class Communicator:
    tn = telnetlib.Telnet()

    def __init__(self, host, port, user, password):
        self._login(user, password)

    def _login(self, host, port, user, password):
        self.tn.open(host, port)
        self.tn.read_until("Username: ")
        self.tn.write(user.encode('ascii') + b"\r\n")
        self.tn.read_until("Password: ")
        self.tn.write(password.encode('ascii') + b"\r\n")

Option C: something else?

I'm always open to suggestions. Like I said, this is my first time playing around with Python and I should practice the Pythonic way of doing things.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using double underscores (name mangling) in front of login? –  gnibbler Jan 17 '13 at 4:29
    
@gnibbler I meant it to be one underscore, thanks for pointing that out. –  squircle Jan 17 '13 at 4:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.