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He told me to put any words into this program and I can see one transform to the other, but I have no idea where to insert the words I want. I downloaded CodeBlocks because it looked like the best C++ runner according to Google but when I click run it just says I need two strings. Guessing that means words.

Can anyone look at this and tell me how to insert 2 words?

The Program:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

#define MIN(X,Y) ((X <= Y) ? X:Y)
#define MIN3(A,B,C) ((A <= MIN(B,C)) ? A : MIN(B,C))

class EDIST {
private:
  string _s1, _s2;
  int _edit_distance;

  enum backtrace_pointer { L, D, U };
  // L==left, D==diagonal, U==up.

  vector<vector<int> > dp_table;
  vector<vector<int> > backtrace;

public:
  EDIST(const char *a, const char *b) {
    _s1 = a;
    _s2 = b;
    _edit_distance = 0;
  }

  void run();

private:
  int edit_distance() const { return _edit_distance; }
  void dp_edit_distance();
  void print_dp_tables();
  void init_dp_tables();
  void print_solution();
};

void EDIST :: print_dp_tables()
{
  cout << "\nPrinting dynamic programming table\n";

  cout << "\t_";
  for ( int i=0; i < _s2.size(); i++ )
    cout << "\t" << _s2[i];
  cout << endl;

  for ( int i=0; i <= _s1.size(); i++ ) {
    if ( i ) cout << _s1[i-1];
    else cout << "_";

    for ( int j=0; j <= _s2.size(); j++ )
      cout << "\t" << dp_table[i][j];
    cout << endl;
  }

  cout << "\nPrinting backtrace table\n";

  cout << "\t_";
  for ( int i=0; i < _s2.size(); i++ )
    cout << "\t" << _s2[i];
  cout << endl;

  for ( int i=0; i <= _s1.size(); i++ ) {
    if ( i ) cout << _s1[i-1];
    else cout << "_";

    for ( int j=0; j <= _s2.size(); j++ ) {
      cout << "\t";
      if ( backtrace[i][j] == L ) cout << "L";
      else if ( backtrace[i][j] == D ) cout << "D";
      else cout << "U";
    }
    cout << endl;
  }
}

void EDIST :: init_dp_tables()
{
  for ( int i=0; i <= _s1.size(); i++ ) {
    vector <int> v;
    vector<int> b;

    for ( int j=0; j <= _s2.size(); j++ ) {
      int n=0, op=0;;

      if ( !i ) { n=j; op=L; }
      else if ( !j ) { n=i; op=U; }
      else { n=0; op=D; }

      v.push_back(n);
      b.push_back(op);
    }

    dp_table.push_back(v);
    backtrace.push_back(b);
  }

  for ( int i=0; i <= _s1.size(); i++ )
    dp_table[i][0] = i;

  for ( int j=0; j <= _s2.size(); j++ )
    dp_table[0][j] = j;
}

void EDIST :: dp_edit_distance()
{
  for ( int j=1; j <= _s2.size(); j++ ) {

    for ( int i=1; i <= _s1.size(); i++ ) {

      int a = dp_table[i-1][j]+1;
      int b = dp_table[i-1][j-1];
      int c = dp_table[i][j-1]+1;

      if ( _s1[i-1] != _s2[j-1] )
    b++;

      dp_table[i][j] = MIN3(a,b,c);

      if ( a == dp_table[i][j] ) backtrace[i][j] = U;
      else if ( b == dp_table[i][j] ) backtrace[i][j] = D;
      else backtrace[i][j] = L;
    }
  }
}

void EDIST :: print_solution()
{
  vector<string> string_sequence;
  string_sequence.push_back(_s2);

  int i = _s1.size();
  int j = _s2.size();

  while ( i || j ) {

    string s = string_sequence[string_sequence.size()-1];

    bool add_string=true;
    int new_i=i, new_j=j;

    if ( backtrace[i][j] == L ) {//LEFT :: insert
      new_j--;
      s.erase(j-1,1);
    }
    else if ( backtrace[i][j] == U ) {//UP : delete
      new_i--;
      string sub1 = (j >= 1 ? s.substr(0,j) : "");
      string sub2 = (j < s.size() ? s.substr(j) : "");
      s = sub1 + _s1[i-1] + sub2;
    }
    else {//DIAGONAL : replace OR no-operation
      new_i--;
      new_j--;
      if ( i && j && dp_table[i][j] != dp_table[new_i][new_j] )
    s.replace(j-1,1,_s1.substr(i-1,1));
      else
    add_string = false;
    }

    if ( add_string ) {
      string_sequence.push_back(s);
      _edit_distance++;
    }

    i = new_i;
    j = new_j;
  }

  cout << "\nEdit distance : " << edit_distance() << endl;

  if ( string_sequence.size() )
    cout << "\nPrinting mutations : \n";

  for ( int i=string_sequence.size()-1; i >= 0; i-- )
    cout << "\t" << string_sequence[i] << endl;

}

void EDIST :: run()
{
  cout << "\nFinding edit-distance between strings `";
  cout << _s1 << "' and `" << _s2 << "'" << endl;

  init_dp_tables();
  dp_edit_distance();
  print_dp_tables();
  print_solution();
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  if ( argc != 3 ) {
    cerr << "Need 2 strings as input!\n" << endl;
    exit(1);
  }

  EDIST e(argv[1], argv[2]);
  e.run();

  return 0;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a question about CodeBlocks rather than about C++, but a quick Google search reveals that you need to select the "Set program arguments" option under the "Project" menu.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You! that worked. So what happens if I want to run this on something else? Does every C++ runner have this option? –  user1985863 Jan 17 '13 at 4:11
    
Yes, I would expect most IDEs would give you that option. –  danben Jan 17 '13 at 4:13
    
Also, please upvote/accept if this answer helped you. Thanks! –  danben Jan 17 '13 at 4:14
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When you downloaded the program you probably got a .exe file, you need to execute this program with two command line arguments like so:

programname.exe word1 word2

If your friend didn't give you a executable file you need to compile the source into an executable. CodeBlocks provides this functionality and automatically runs the compiled result. Unfortunately it doesn't pass any arguments to the result which is why the program is telling you that it needs two words. (CodeBlocks is just executing programname.exe)

One solution to this problem is to configure code blocks to provide the arguments. As danben pointed out you can use the "Set program arguments" option in the "Project" menu to configure it to provide arguments. If you set your program arguments as word1 word2 then CodeBlocks will execute programname.exe word1 word2 which is what you want.

If you want to run this program elsewhere you need to compile it. Luckily whenever you click "run" in CodeBlocks it actually does compile an executable somewhere, typically in the project folder under bin\debug or bin\release you'll find a exectuable file. You can use this file as outlined above.

share|improve this answer
    
No, the program he downloaded is an IDE. He wants to pass command-line arguments to the C++ program posted in the question. –  danben Jan 17 '13 at 4:05
    
From the original question it sounded like his friend gave him some source code and wanted him to execute the program with two words. –  Jake Woods Jan 17 '13 at 4:09
    
That's right. He downloaded source code, not a binary. Or rather, he did also download a binary, but the binary is the CodeBlocks IDE. –  danben Jan 17 '13 at 4:10
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