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If I have the following python dict "mydict":

mydict = {
       "folder": "myfolder",
       "files": [
    { "folder": "subfolder",
    "files": []
    },
    { "folder": "anotherfolder",
    "files": [
    { "folder": "subsubfolder",
    "files": []
    },
    { "folder": "subotherfolder",
    "files": []
    }
    ]
    },
         ]
    }

How can I make it such that if I have another dict "newdict":

newdict = {
"folder":"newfolder"
"files":[]
}

How/Is it possible to write a function the takes two arguments ("current dictionary to be added to","dict i want to add", "foldername-to-insert-under" such that after calling the function with:

desiredfunction(mydict, newdict, "subsubfolder")

I would like the function to search my existing "mydict" for the appropriate "files" array to append "newdict".

mydict = {
       "folder": "myfolder",
       "files": [
    { "folder": "subfolder",
    "files": []
    },
    { "folder": "anotherfolder",
    "files": [
    { "folder": "subsubfolder",
    "files": [
{
"folder":"newfolder"
"files":[]
}
]
    },
    { "folder": "subotherfolder",
    "files": []
    }
    ]
    },
         ]
    }

What is the best way to do this? I do not know how/if its possible to search an existing dictionary structure, search within multiple levels of a nested dictionary to appropriately insert a new dict before, help is appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

If you know the shape (amount of nested levels, types, etc.) of the data structure, you can just write a procedure containing the proper amount of for loops to iterate over the data structure and find the key.

If you don't know the shape of the data structure, you can recursively traverse the data structure until it's empty or the appropriate key has been found.

EDIT: Oh, you want to add a new dict inside the old dict. I thought you wanted to add something from the old dict to the new one.

ex. If you want to insert 'something' under the key 'z' in a dict, and you know what the dict is going to look like at all times,

example = {0: {'a': 'dummy'}, 1: {'z': 'dummy'}}
for thing1 in example:
    for thing2 in thing1:
        if thing2 == 'z':
            example[thing1][thing2] = 'something'

If you don't know what the dict is going to look like, or if you don't want to hardcode the for loops,

example = {0: {'a': 'dummy'}, 1: {'b': {'z': 'dummy'}}}
replacement = 'something'
path = [1, 'b', 'z']

parent = example
while path:
    key = path.pop(0)
    if path:
        parent = parent[key]
    else:
        parent[key] = replacement

print example

where path can be passed as an argument to a recursive call of a recursive procedure that traverses the dict.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you recursively search down a nested dict and insert at that point without hardcoding? Could you provide a basic function demonstrating how you can iteratively search, while keeping some sort of reference to the level of the array you are in so that you can insert at that point? From what I can tell python does not appear to support such referencing. Your example assumes that the old dict would only have a single level... if there were 3 levels or 4 levels, your sample code would not work. If you did not have to hardcode the number of for loops.. that is my main issue. –  Setsuna Jan 17 '13 at 4:34
    
Good point. I edited my post to include a code snippet that contains what you're looking for. –  SamCode Jan 17 '13 at 4:44

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