Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a query for a contact messaging system that is getting exponentially slow the more joins I do.

The table structure is basically a contact table, and a contact field table.

The query joins the contact field table many time, and for each join I do, it takes twice as long.

This is the query.

SELECT  SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS
    `contact_data`.`id`,
    `contact_data`.`name`,
    `fields0`.`value` AS `fields0`,
    `fields1`.`value` AS `fields1`,
    `fields2`.`value` AS `fields2`,
    ...etc...
    CONTACT_DATA_TAGS(
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_tags`.`name`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_read`.`user`)
    ) AS `tags`,
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`) AS `assignments`,
    `contact_data`.`updated`,
    `contact_data`.`created`
FROM
    `contact_data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_tags ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_tags.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_assignment ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_assignment.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_read ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_read.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_fields AS fields0 ON contact_data.`id` = fields0.`contact_data_id` AND fields0.`key` = :field1
LEFT JOIN contact_data_fields AS fields1 ON contact_data.`id` = fields1.`contact_data_id` AND fields1.`key` = :field2
LEFT JOIN contact_data_fields AS fields2 ON contact_data.`id` = fields2.`contact_data_id` AND fields2.`key` = :field3
...etc...
GROUP BY contact_data.`id`
ORDER BY `id` DESC

This is the table structure:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `contact_data` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(200) NOT NULL,
  `format` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `fields` longtext NOT NULL,
  `url` varchar(2000) NOT NULL,
  `referer` varchar(2000) DEFAULT NULL,
  `ip` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  `agent` varchar(1000) DEFAULT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `updated` datetime NOT NULL,
  `updater` int(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `name` (`name`),
  KEY `url` (`url`(333)),
  KEY `ip` (`ip`),
  KEY `created` (`created`),
  KEY `updated` (`updated`),
  KEY `updater` (`updater`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `contact_data_assignment` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `user` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `data` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `updater` int(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `unique_assignment` (`user`,`data`),
  KEY `user` (`user`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `contact_data_fields` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `contact_data_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `key` varchar(200) NOT NULL,
  `value` text NOT NULL,
  `updated` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `contact_data_id` (`contact_data_id`),
  KEY `key` (`key`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `contact_data_read` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `user` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `data` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `type` enum('admin','email') NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `user` (`user`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `contact_data_tags` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(200) NOT NULL,
  `data` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `updater` int(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `unique_tag` (`name`,`data`),
  KEY `name` (`name`),
  KEY `data` (`data`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION `contact_data_tags`(`tags` TEXT, `assigned` BOOL, `read` BOOL) RETURNS text CHARSET latin1
BEGIN
    RETURN CONCAT(
        ',',
        IFNULL(`tags`, ''),
        ',',
        IF(`tags` IS NULL OR FIND_IN_SET('Closed', `tags`) = 0, 'Open', ''),
        ',',
        IF(`assigned` IS NULL, 'Unassigned', ''),
        ',',
        IF(`read` IS NULL, 'New', ''),
        ','
    );
END$$

DELIMITER ;

Anyone know why it runs so slow? What can I do to make it faster? Do I need to adjust the query (I would prefer not adjust the structure)? Is there any config options I can set to speed it up?

Also strange is that it seems to work faster on my Windows development machine , compared to my Debain production server (almost instant, compared to 30+ seconds).

But the Windows machine is far less powerful than the Debain server (8 core Xeon, 32GB RAM).

Running MySQL 5.1.49 on Debian (which I can't update), and 5.5.28 on Windows.

So reading that EAV does not perform well in RDBMS (or at least in my case), is the a config option that I could increase to make this run faster (i.e. can I just throw more RAM at it)?

share|improve this question
4  
Ah, the joy that is the Entity-Attribute-Value-Model. Does not work too well in relational databases. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… An RDBMS likes to know its fields in advance. Do you need to expose all these configurable contact_data_fields to the database (for queries)? If not, maybe store a JSON in a CLOB. Or use a NoSQL document database. Or if they are not configurable, just use "regular" columns. –  Thilo Jan 17 '13 at 4:38
    
@Thilo yes I need to expose them for queries. I moved away from JSON, for this reason. –  Petah Jan 17 '13 at 4:39
1  
Correction: EAV works pretty well in some databases, with the right key and/or clustering table structure. –  wildplasser Jan 17 '13 at 21:33
2  
EAV works fine (regarding efficiency) with proper indexing. See a similar problem at DBA.SE : Subqueries run very fast individually, but when joined are very slow. No indexes->300-seconds. Add-Indexes->30-milliseconds. –  ypercube Jan 17 '13 at 22:31
1  
You will probably need more indexes at the other tables, too, like the contact_data_read table. Depends on how you join the tables and which columns are used in the SELECT list. –  ypercube Jan 18 '13 at 8:58
show 8 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+125

One way to speed up the query would be to link to contact_data_fields once only (on contact_data.id = contact_data_fields.contact_data_id) and change the fields columns to be max expressions - like so:

SELECT  SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS
    `contact_data`.`id`,
    `contact_data`.`name`,
    MAX(CASE WHEN fields.`key` = :field1 THEN fields.`value` END) AS `fields0`,
    MAX(CASE WHEN fields.`key` = :field2 THEN fields.`value` END) AS `fields1`,
    MAX(CASE WHEN fields.`key` = :field3 THEN fields.`value` END) AS `fields2`,
    ...etc...
    CONTACT_DATA_TAGS(
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_tags`.`name`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_read`.`user`)
    ) AS `tags`,
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`) AS `assignments`,
    `contact_data`.`updated`,
    `contact_data`.`created`
FROM
    `contact_data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_tags ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_tags.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_assignment ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_assignment.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_read ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_read.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_fields AS fields
       ON contact_data.`id` = fields.`contact_data_id` 
...etc...
GROUP BY contact_data.`id`
ORDER BY `id` DESC
share|improve this answer
    
+1, I thought to suggest this as an additional bonus, in case his contact_data_fields table is actually dumped wholly, but I doubt it =) –  newtover Jan 21 '13 at 13:38
    
I haven't tried this yet, but will do soon and let you know. –  Petah Jan 23 '13 at 6:25
    
This worked a treat, thanks. I will add another bounty to reward you. –  Petah Feb 1 '13 at 11:29
    
@Petah: Many thanks! –  Mark Bannister Feb 3 '13 at 19:42
add comment

Unfortunately, there are lot of inefficiencies in your query. I do not think you will manage to solve the problem by just tuning some parameters and adding more RAM:

  • To start with, we do not know the sizes of your tables, and why would you need to dump the whole table contact_data. There are no additional conditions and limits (which usually do matter).
  • We do not know as well, if there can be several records with the same (contact_data_id, key) for a given contact_data.id. I would think thre can be {0, 1} records, and this can be made more explicit if you would have the corresponding unique index (which is eventually required as an index for the query to be efficient)
  • SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS is an additional killer (in case you are going to use LIMIT), since it makes MySQL to compute and scan through the whole result to count the rows (I would just count the rows with a separate query fetching bare ids and cache its result. MySQL's own Query Cache might be enough if the tables are not changed very frequently)

As soon as you add an index on (contact_data_id, key), I would isolate the grouping and sorting into a subquery and then LEFT JOIN on the contact_data_fields (without any sorting). You current query makes the same LEFT JOIN comparison for each row in the product of the contact_data, contact_data_tags, contact_data_assignment, contact_data_read before they are grouped (not mentioning that you server stores that whole intermediate result before everithing is grouped and duplicate data is thrown off).

share|improve this answer
    
The size of data is about 20,000 rows in contact_data and 200,000 in contact_data_fields. The other joins are hardly significant and could probably be removed if required. There is no extra where statements, and sometimes will be no limit (export to xls). Yes there can be multiple same keys for one contact_data_id. SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS is required as I need stats for "showing 100 out of 10,000 filtered from 100,000 rows" –  Petah Jan 23 '13 at 6:23
add comment

I'll add to all theses interestings comments my own experiences with Entity-Attribute-Value-Model queries and MySQL.

First do not forget you have a low limit in MySQL on the number of joins 61 joins. At first it seems a big number. But with this model it could easily crash your queries with a nice SQLSTATE[HY000]: General error: 1116.

I experienced these exponential slowdowns as well. When we first reach more than 20s for queries with 50 joins on 50 000 rows tables we found that 14.5s on theses 15s were lost in the query optimizer -- it seems it was trying to guess the best join order for theses 50 joins --. So by simply adding the keywords STRAIGHT_JOIN right after the SELECT keyword we were back to normal time. Of course doing that means you must get a nice indexation scheme and you must write your queries with a clever join order (tables with best indexes and best population reduce should appears first).

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN (...)

Note that this keyword can also be used on the JOIN syntax.

STRAIGHT_JOIN forces the optimizer to join the tables in the order in which they are listed in the FROM clause. You can use this to speed up a query if the optimizer joins the tables in nonoptimal order.

I would add "or if it takes 95% of te query time to guess this order" :-)

Check also this page for other query optimizer settings directly on the query.

Then you have differences between 5.1 and 5.5... well there are so much much diffference between theses versions, it's like being working with two different Database servers. You should really consider using 5.5 in production, for speed improvments (check also Percona) but also for transaction and locks improvments, and if you need just one reason it's that you'll get bugs in production that you de not have in dev.

Theses queries containing a lot of joins will by definition stress the server. You will need some fine tuning in the my.cnf file to control the server behavior. For example try to avoid creation of temporary tables (check the explain output on the query). A 2s query can become a 120s query just because you are reaching a limit and going to temporary files to manage your 20 or 30 joins and sorts and group by. Putting data on disk is really really slow compared to in memory work. This is especially controlled by theses two settings:

tmp_table_size = 1024M
max_heap_table_size = 1024M

Here we say "keep in memory work for request if it take less than 1Go of RAM". Of course if you do that avoid having 500 parallel scripts runnings theses requests -- if you need it on a regular basis for a lot of parallel requests consider avoiding this scheme of data.

This also leads to one important point. You are reaching the frontier of one request complexity. The SQL server is usually faster than your application to aggregate data in one result. But when the size of the data is big, and you add a lot of indexes in the query (at least one per join), and sorting, grouping, and even aggregating results with group_contact... MySQL will quite certainly go using temporary files and it will be slow. By using several short queries (a main query without group by and then 10 or 200 queries to get the content you would have for group_contact fields for example) you may be faster by avoiding temporary file usage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info. With regards to upgrading the production, I have noticed that my 5.5 install is far more strict than 5.1 and hence it breaking some of my code. –  Petah Jan 25 '13 at 1:22
    
^Petah. Also I forget to add one point, check that only numbers are used for indexes, text columns indexes perform really bad and use mor space. –  regilero Jan 25 '13 at 7:35
add comment

Based on Mark Bannisters query, possibly use something like this to return the field / value details as a delimited list:-

SELECT  SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS
    `contact_data`.`id`,
    `contact_data`.`name`,
    GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT_WS(',', contact_data_fields.`key`, contact_data_fields.`value`)),
    CONTACT_DATA_TAGS(
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_tags`.`name`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_read`.`user`)
    ) AS `tags`,
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`) AS `assignments`,
    `contact_data`.`updated`,
    `contact_data`.`created`
FROM
    `contact_data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_tags ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_tags.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_assignment ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_assignment.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_read ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_read.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_fields ON contact_data.`id` = contact_data_fields.`contact_data_id` 
WHERE contact_data_fields.`key` IN (:field1, :field2, :field3, etc)
GROUP BY contact_data.`id`
ORDER BY `id` DESC

Depending on the number of matching rows in the contact_data_tags, contact_data_assignment and contact_data_read tables (and so possibly the number of intermediate rows for each contact_data.id) then it may be quicker to get the contact key / value details from a subselect.

SELECT  SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS
    `contact_data`.`id`,
    `contact_data`.`name`,
    Sub1.ContactKeyValue,
    CONTACT_DATA_TAGS(
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_tags`.`name`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`),
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_read`.`user`)
    ) AS `tags`,
    GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT `contact_data_assignment`.`user`) AS `assignments`,
    `contact_data`.`updated`,
    `contact_data`.`created`
FROM
    `contact_data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_tags ON contact_data.id = contact_data_tags.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_assignment ON contact_data.id = contact_data_assignment.`data`
LEFT JOIN contact_data_read ON contact_data.id = contact_data_read.`data`
LEFT JOIN (SELECT contact_data_id, GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT_WS(',', contact_data_fields.`key`, contact_data_fields.`value`)) AS ContactKeyValue FROM contact_data_fields 
WHERE fields.`key` IN (:field1, :field2, :field3, etc) GROUP BY contact_data_id) Sub1 ON contact_data.id = Sub1.contact_data_id
GROUP BY contact_data.id
ORDER BY `id` DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Problem with a concatenated values is it can't be searched and sorted. Or am I missing something? –  Petah Jan 23 '13 at 19:55
    
Not ideal to search them and possibly slow enough to use up any performance saving, but depends on how you want to search them. In the code reading this SQL it would probably be easy enough, but can't really comment with the info posted here. Within SQL it is harder although if needs be you could use find in set. You could also do without the concatenated values and have one row for each of field1, field2, etc, and deal with it in code afterwards. –  Kickstart Jan 24 '13 at 9:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.