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I need a grep or sed statement that would only take out the dates from this statement:

echo 'asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd' 

So answer should be something like this:

12-Dec-13 11-Jan-12

I have gotten far enough to get 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12, but I cant remove the content between the dates. Is it possible to use a sed statement to keep the first word and last word using space to show which is the last word? The result should remain the same.

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check here:theunixshell.blogspot.com/2013/01/… –  Vijay Jan 17 '13 at 6:38
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9 Answers

 grep -o "[0-9]\{2\}-[^0-9]\{3\}-[^a-z]\{2\}" file | sed "N;s/\n/ /g"

12-Dec-13 11-Jan-12

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use following

echo 'asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd' | sed 's/ /\n/g' |grep '-' | tr -d '\n' |sed 's/$/ \n/g'

output is

12-Dec-1311-Jan-12

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too many commands :( –  Vijay Jan 17 '13 at 6:40
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One way:

$ echo 'asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd' | sed 's/.*\(..-...-..\).*\(..-...-..\).*/\1 \2/'
12-Dec-13 11-Jan-12

To make the search pattern more specific for numbers and alphabets:

$ echo 'asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd' | sed 's/.*\([0-9][0-9]-[a-zA-Z]\{3\}-[0-9][0-9]\).*\([0-9][0-9]-[a-zA-Z]\{3\}-[0-9][0-9]\).*/\1 \2/'
12-Dec-13 11-Jan-12
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what if there are more than two date's in the line? –  Vijay Jan 17 '13 at 6:39
    
@sarathi : I provide answer to what exactly OP asked. –  Guru Jan 17 '13 at 7:08
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Use POSIX Character Classes

A set of POSIX character classes would match your desired text. For example:

\b[[:digit:]]{2}-[[:upper:]][[:lower:]]{2}-[[:digit:]]{2}\b

Sample Input/Output

The following pipeline will extract just the relevant text using GNU Grep, then concatenate the dates:

$ echo 'asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd' |
    grep -Eo '\b[[:digit:]]{2}-[[:upper:]][[:lower:]]{2}-[[:digit:]]{2}\b' |
    xargs
12-Dec-13 11-Jan-12
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Try with awk

awk '{for(i=1; i<NF; ++i){if ($i ~ /[0-9]+[-\w]*/) print $i}}' temp.txt

Will work with any number of lines and columns

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perl -lne '@a=/([\d]+-[a-zA-Z]{3}-[\d]+)/g;print "@a"'

tested:

> echo 'asdfdsfa 12-Dec-13 asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd' | perl -lne '@a=/([\d]+-[a-zA-Z]{3}-[\d]+)/g;print "@a"'
12-Dec-13 11-Jan-12
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I am suggesting data -d. So it will even validate the date.

[sgeorge@sgeorge-ld ~]$ cat string 
asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd

[sgeorge@sgeorge-ld ~]$ for i in `cat string`; do date -d $i &>/dev/null && echo $i; done
12-Dec-13
11-Jan-12
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 'H;g;:a;s/\s*\n$//;t;s/\n(..-...-..)\b/\1 \n/;ta;s/\n([^0-9]+)/\n/;ta' file
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try this one:

echo 'asdfdsfa asdfs 12-Dec-13 asdasd asdf 11-Jan-12 asdasd'  | sed 's: :\n:g' | grep ^[0-9]
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