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SO I'm building a game where there are a lot of different powerups. Whenever the player collides with these powerups things happen i.e. more life, more bullets, more score, etc.

I want to separate the powerup logic from the player logic so there is better decoupling so this is what I'm doing

//in the coin class
@Override
    public void onCollision(GameObject<?> go) {
        super.onCollision(go);
        if (go instanceof IHasCoins)
        {
            IHasCoins object = (IHasCoins)go;
                        object.increaseCoins(value)
        }
    }

another example

// the bullet powerup
    @Override
        public void onCollision(GameObject<?> go) {
            super.onCollision(go);
            if (go instanceof IHasBullets)
            {
                IHasBullets object = (IHasBullets)go;
                            object.increaseBullets(value)
            }
        }

so my player class is something like this

Player implements IHasBullets,IHasCoins, IHasXXX,...
{
     void inscreaseBullets(){//code};
     void inscreaseCoins(){//code};
     ...
}

as you can see this is cool because all the powerup logic is decoupled but I'm concerned for performance issues (I have been told instanceof can be slow) and design issues (I have been told instanceof is a "never to use" kind of thing)

share|improve this question
1  
You are very wise to try and reduce casts. Are the interfaces used only in player? It looks like you are going overboard with them.. –  Karthik T Jan 17 '13 at 4:56
    
In this particular case, don't you have just one player object? Your collision handler could simply test for go == player. –  s.bandara Jan 17 '13 at 4:58
    
Enemies have them too, like an IEnemy so when the player collides with an IEnemy stuff happens (game over, life loss,etc) –  fernandohur Jan 17 '13 at 4:59
2  
Right, but it's all about <something> colliding with the player and you already implement the handler in the <something>? –  s.bandara Jan 17 '13 at 5:01
    
Oh I see what you're saying just give all the powerups and enemies an instance of the player, right? –  fernandohur Jan 17 '13 at 5:02

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