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I am working with GTK in Python. I noticed that it is easy to SAVE AS but for some reason I cannot just SAVE a file. I thought I'd set it up to check if it was saved at all and then SAVE but for some reason it restarts the function over and over w/o saving the value of filename. The thing that is killing me is this feels like a beginner mistake. somehow I have forgotten to keep the value after the function has been run. I hope this makes sense.

def SaveFile(filename):
    chooser = gtk.FileChooserDialog("Save File...", None,
                                    gtk.FILE_CHOOSER_ACTION_SAVE,
                                    (gtk.STOCK_CANCEL, gtk.RESPONSE_CANCEL, 
                                     gtk.STOCK_SAVE, gtk.RESPONSE_OK))

    filename = chooser.get_filename()
    if filename == None:
        response = chooser.run()
        if response == gtk.RESPONSE_OK:
            filename = chooser.get_filename()
            chooser.destroy()
            wbuffer = textview.get_buffer()
            text = wbuffer.get_text(wbuffer.get_start_iter(), wbuffer.get_end_iter())
            openfile = open(filename,"w")
            openfile.write(text)
            openfile.close()
            print filename, "this is the first part"
            return filename
        else:
            chooser.destroy()
    elif filename != None:
        wbuffer = textview.get_buffer()
        text = wbuffer.get_text(wbuffer.get_start_iter(), wbuffer.get_end_iter())
        openfile = open(filename,"w")
        openfile.write(text)
        openfile.close()
        print filename, "made it this far"
        return filename
    else:
        chooser.destroy()
        return filename
share|improve this question
    
Your code indentation was completely messed up and thus hard to read. You had tabs and spaces mixed. Please go with PEP 8 and use 4-space indentation. Could you please make sure that I didn't change the flow of your code with my edit? –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 17 '13 at 7:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As far as I can tell, you don't persist your filename in any way between the calls. You call filename = chooser.get_filename() on a newly created FileChooseDialog - this will always return None.

As I don't know more about the architecture of your program, I can just propose using a global variable to persist the filename, e.g.:

filename = None

def SaveFile(filename):
    global filename
    if filename == None:
        chooser = gtk.FileChooserDialog("Save File...", None,
                                    gtk.FILE_CHOOSER_ACTION_SAVE,
                                    (gtk.STOCK_CANCEL, gtk.RESPONSE_CANCEL, 
                                     gtk.STOCK_SAVE, gtk.RESPONSE_OK))
        response = chooser.run()
        if response == gtk.RESPONSE_OK:
            filename = chooser.get_filename()
            chooser.destroy()
            wbuffer = textview.get_buffer()
            text = wbuffer.get_text(wbuffer.get_start_iter(), wbuffer.get_end_iter())
            openfile = open(filename,"w")
            openfile.write(text)
            openfile.close()
            print filename, "this is the first part"
            return filename
        else:
            chooser.destroy()
    elif filename != None:
        wbuffer = textview.get_buffer()
        text = wbuffer.get_text(wbuffer.get_start_iter(), wbuffer.get_end_iter())
        openfile = open(filename,"w")
        openfile.write(text)
        openfile.close()
        print filename, "made it this far"
        return filename
    else:
        chooser.destroy()
        return filename

But remember, altering global variables is always dangerous, maybe you can think of a better approach. If you put your method into a class, you could make filename an attribute of this class, e.g., self._filename.

Another remark: Don't ever duplicate code. In the if-branch and in the elif-branch, you call

        wbuffer = textview.get_buffer()
        text = wbuffer.get_text(wbuffer.get_start_iter(), wbuffer.get_end_iter())
        openfile = open(filename,"w")
        openfile.write(text)
        openfile.close()

Put this into a separate method. I promise you'll forget to change the second occurrence of this code snippet if you ever come to change your file-writing.

share|improve this answer
    
Making them global did the trick. You're right making the classes should work and keep getting the value from the class. If anyone plans to make it global.I hit a point that to save w/o having to have opened a file and I just had to except NameError: and call the SaveAs Function. Hopefully it will help the next person down the way.Thanks Thorsten Kranz –  ApertureSecurity Jan 20 '13 at 6:08

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