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JavaScript Exception Handling

I have a web application where 100% of the javascript code executes as jQuery event handlers (I guess most jQuery apps are like this).

The question is how can I define a global exception handler. That is, if a function that is called when any exception that happens within any jQuery event handler goes uncaught (whether it is onload, click, a succesfull ajax call, an ajax error, whatever). My function would receive the error info (exception, stacktrace, whatever).

Clarification: I don't mean globally catching in ajax problems generated by the server or network, but globally catching problems that are due to (presumably) bugs in our code.

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marked as duplicate by Ja͢ck, Eevee, Bergi, Jon Egerton, RB. Jan 17 '13 at 10:13

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I guess this can be achieved using concepts from the Aspect-oriented programming.

We can simply create a wrapper of jQuery.event.dispatch which will handle the errors:

(function () {
    var temp = jQuery.event.handle;
    jQuery.event.handle = function () {
       try {
          temp.apply(this, arguments);
       } catch (e) {
          console.log('Error while dispatching the event.');
       }
    }
}());
$(document).click(function () {
    throw 'Some error...';
});

Using this approach you must be very careful because of changes in the internal interface

  • Note the example above works for jQuery v1.6.3, in jQuery 1.7.1 jQuery.event.dispatch instead of jQuery.event.handle.
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+1 for interface changes –  Tx3 Jan 17 '13 at 8:55

You can use window.onerror : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/window.onerror

window.onerror = function errorHandler(msg, url, line) {

  console.log(arguments);

  // Just let default handler run.
  return false;
}
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This should be the accepted answer –  vsync Jun 23 '14 at 12:37
    
this almost never works. :) Note that some/many error events do not trigger window.onerror, you have to listen for them specifically they said. –  mayankcpdixit Jun 15 at 14:13

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