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I have two queries below:

SELECT cl.`cl_boolean`, l.`l_name`
FROM `card_legality` cl
LEFT JOIN `legality` l ON l.`legality_id` = cl.`legality_id`
WHERE cl.`card_id` = 23155


SELECT cl.`cl_boolean`, l.`l_name`
FROM `card_legality` cl
LEFT JOIN `legality` l ON l.`legality_id` = cl.`legality_id`
WHERE cl.`card_id` = 23155 or 1 = 2

(this is not the true case, just show the problem)

I want to know why the second one is so slow(almost 100 times slower in true case).

Okay, below is the query(oracle) in my case:

select *
from LA_TESTCASE this_ 
left outer join LA_RULE   rule1_    on this_.ROOTCAUSE_RULE_ID = rule1_.ID 
left outer join LA_TEST   test2_    on this_.TEST_ID = test2_.ID 
left outer join LA_SUITE  suite3_   on test2_.SUITE_ID = suite3_.ID 
left outer join LA_RUN    run4_     on suite3_.RUN_ID = run4_.ID
where (run4_.NAME = 'RRP_XO-245'/* or 1 = 2*/)
order by this_.ID desc;

It's almost the same as the sample case.

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3  
as backticks aren't valid in Oracle, you definatley ran this on Oracle? also if so , please post explain plans. Oracle would not normally even factor in the or 1=2 (it would ignore the whole clause). –  DazzaL Jan 17 '13 at 8:26
    
I think it's mySql and not oracle DB –  A.B.Cade Jan 17 '13 at 8:32
    
Backquotes mean that this is (probably) MySQL. But even MySQL can identify that 1=2 is always false and remove it from the plan. @bopie, please provide a query that is more close to the actual case and not entirely stripped to pieces. –  ypercube Jan 17 '13 at 8:33
    
See How MySQL Optimizes WHERE Clauses –  ypercube Jan 17 '13 at 8:39
    
I think you should put the explain plans of both queries now. –  Florin Ghita Jan 17 '13 at 8:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"It's almost the same as the sample case.". actually it's nothing like it.

in the first case, you were filtering on the left table of a left join. in the second, you are filtering on the right (outer joined table) of the query.

the presence of OR 1=2 in that case will most likely cause a full table scan to resolve it (again, run the explain plans to see this).

but your query makes no sense in that you are outer joining RUN4_ but then filtering on it in the WHERE clause (not the join itself).

run4_.NAME = 'RRP_XO-245'

you should tidy up the logic of the query.

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"but your query makes no sense in that you are outer joining RUN4 but then filtering on it in the WHERE clause" - nice catch –  Florin Ghita Jan 17 '13 at 12:39

In this case the cause is OR.

In the first query, the engine may use an index on card_id. It uses probably a hash join to join the two tables.

In the second the existence of OR cause the possibility of existence more rows that may not have card_id=23155. So, the index is useless: it should scan the entire table.

Also, in general or conditions are harder to put in hash joins, so it may be forced to do a NESTED LOOOPS JOIN.

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Are you answering regarding Oracle? –  ypercube Jan 17 '13 at 8:41
    
Yes, I don't have a good experience on MySql. I said something missleading? –  Florin Ghita Jan 17 '13 at 8:42

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