Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Does the multiplication factor of a column's length somehow influence the database performance?

In other words, what is the difference between the performance of the following two tables:

TBL1:
  - CLMN1 VARCHAR2(63)
  - CLMN2 VARCHAR2(129)
  - CLMN3 VARCHAR2(250)

and

TBL2:
  - CLMN1 VARCHAR2(64)
  - CLMN2 VARCHAR2(128)
  - CLMN3 VARCHAR2(256)

Should we always attempt to make a column's length to some power of 2 or does only the maximum size matter?

Some of the developers claim that there is some link between the multiplication factor of the length of the columns in a database, because it influences how Oracle distributes and saves the data on the disk and shares its cache in memory. Can someone prove or disprove this?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried performance testing it? – beny23 Jan 17 '13 at 8:56
    
No. I wonder what is a theoretical explanation of the difference if it is present. Because of many times developers like assigning binary-powered length of columns (64, 128 ...). I wonder: why? Does it really somehow influence? – Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 8:58
2  
It's possible the developers you know are thinking of hash partitioning where it's recommended that the number of partitions is a power of 2 – Ben Jan 17 '13 at 9:12
    
@Ben thank you, it is a valuable article. But I don't yet understand: is any link between this partitions and columns length? – Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 9:16
    
None @Andremoniy, which is why this isn't an answer. I'm guessing that the developers you know might be confusing partitioning with column lengths and therefore (I haven't tested this or seen anything to suggest it's right/wrong, though I believe it to be wrong) – Ben Jan 17 '13 at 9:17
up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is no difference in performance. And there are no hidden optimizations done because of power of 2.

The only thing that does make a difference in how things are stored is the actual data. 100 characters stored in a VARCHAR2(2000) column are stored exactly the same way as 100 characters stored in a VARCHAR2(500) column.

Think of the length as a business constraint, not as part of the data type. The only thing that should driver your decision about the length are the business constraints about the data that is put in there.

Edit: the only situation where the length does make a difference, is when you need an index on that column. Older Oracle versions (< 10) did have a limit on the key length and that was checked when creating the index.

Even though it's possible in Oracle 11, it might not be the wisest choice to have an index on a value with 4000 characters.

Edit 2:

So I was curious and setup a simple test:

create table narrow (id varchar(40));
create table wide (id varchar(4000));

Then filled both tables with strings composed of 40 'X'. If there was indeed a (substantial) difference between the storage, this should show up somehow when retrieving the data, right?

Both tables have exactly 1048576 rows.

Connected to:
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.3.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Data Mining and Real Application Testing options

SQL> set autotrace traceonly statistics
SQL> select count(*) from wide;


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          1  db block gets
       6833  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        349  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        472  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

SQL> select count(*) from narrow;


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          1  db block gets
       6833  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        349  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        472  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

SQL>

So the full table scan for both tables did exactly the same. So what happens when we actually select the data?

SQL> select * from wide;

1048576 rows selected.


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          4  recursive calls
          2  db block gets
      76497  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
   54386472  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
     769427  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
      69907  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
    1048576  rows processed

SQL> select * from narrow;

1048576 rows selected.


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          4  recursive calls
          2  db block gets
      76485  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
   54386472  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
     769427  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
      69907  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
    1048576  rows processed

SQL>

There is a slight difference in consistent gets, but that could be due to caching.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. So, you claims, that there isn't any influence of columns length on how Oracle distributes database files on the disk and database cache in memory, so multiplication factor has no any sense? – Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 9:01
2  
Only the actual length of the data influences this, not the declared maximum length. (And of course other configuration properties such as PCTFREE) – a_horse_with_no_name Jan 17 '13 at 9:04
1  
@kevtufc: yes, that's what I'm saying. There is one thing to keep in mind though: indexing. I have edited my question. – a_horse_with_no_name Jan 17 '13 at 9:16
1  
@Plouf! Dear, I'm not minimizing the authority of a_horse_with_no_name. I just want to wait for another opinions and evaluations. Furthermore, I'd like to have theoretical substantiation of this question. Else if somebody will ask me: why do you think so? - my answer like: "a_horse_with_no_name said so" will not have any sense :) – Andremoniy Jan 17 '13 at 9:20
1  
The only other case I'm aware of where the size of VARCHAR2's made any difference was when using them in PL/SQL - the amount of memory allocated to variables based on the columns varied depending on whether they were greater or less than a tipping point (used to be 2000, now it's 4000 I believe). – Jeffrey Kemp Jan 24 '13 at 3:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.