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I want to write something like

fun factorial 0 = 1
  | factorial n = n * factorial(n-1);

but I don't get the "|" sign when i want to start the new line. I get something like:

fun factorial 0 = 1
=   factorial n = n * factorial(n-1);

when I start the second line of code. If I hold shift and "\" I dont get the vertical bar, I get something else.

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Never mind, ig ot it. you write –  user1913592 Jan 17 '13 at 12:09
    
fun factorial 0 = 1 = | factorial n = n * factorial(n-1); –  user1913592 Jan 17 '13 at 12:10
    
When you say you get something else. What do you get? You clearly know how to write a pipe, given the amount of pipes in your post. –  Jesper.Reenberg Jan 17 '13 at 17:25
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1 Answer

Since you say that the second line starts with an equal sign (=), it appear that you are writing your code directly into the interpreter?

In any case you have to write the pipe your self. The pipe is part of the SML syntax, and is used to "indicate" different function clauses, whereas the semicolon has a double meaning here. Doubling as being part of the SML syntax (though not strictly needed here) and as a special indicator to the interpreter (as explained below).

Most interpreters will keep reading data from stdin until it reads a semicolon, and first then will it start to interpret what you have written. In the case of the SML/NJ interpreter, the first line is indicated by starting with a "-" and any subsequent lines starts with a "=". Note that the "-" and "=" signs are not interpreted as part of the final program. An example of this can be seen below

- fun foo 0 y = 0
=   | foo 1 y = y
=   | foo x y = x*y;
val foo = fn : int -> int -> int

Here the last line is the output from the interpreter, when it reads the semicolon. However we could also have declared two functions before writing the semicolon

- fun foo 0 y = 0
=   | foo 1 y = y
=   | foo x y = x * y
= fun fact 0 = 1
=   | fact n = n * fact (n-1);
val foo = fn : int -> int -> int
val fact = fn : int -> int

Regarding the pipe, it depends on your keyboard layout, whether or not you will get it by typing shift+"\". However since your post contains multiple pipes, I suppose you already know how to write one.

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